System Will Not Power Back On After Power Loss

Hey Guys -

I've got a "server" at home which I depend on for everything.  It alone contains almost 30tb of data plus is a file share, web server, and used for gaming.  Yesterday, the monitoring I had on it said it was offline (I was at work.)  I tried restarting it remotely (I have the BIOS set to always power back on after a power loss plus have it connected to a WeMo switch which I may control remotely) which seemed to work as I got a ping for a few seconds, but then nothing.

Once home, I found that it was off and wouldn't power back on.  When connected to power (and power supply on), the LED power button on the MB was orange meaning it was getting some kind of power, but wouldn't turn on (no fans spin, no drives spin up - nothing.)   I found a note on my door that the power company had come out and installed an "advanced" power meter which is what caused the power to go out and was the initial issue.

Below are system specs plus what I've (unsuccessfully) tried so far to resolve the issue...

System Specs
- Intel i7 3770k CPU / 16gb RAM
- MB: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H
- Nvidia GeForce GTS 660 3gb
- Storage : 3 partitions
   - C:\ - 256gb SSD (Samsung 850 Pro)
   - D:\ - 28tb Drive Pool (x12 SATA drives pooled using Stablebit DrivePool)
   - E:\ - 1tb Hybrid Drive (App & Game Installs)
- Power Supply: CORSAIR HXi HX1000i (1,000 watt)

What I've Tried So Far
- Bypassing WeMo switch & plugging directly into outlet
- Unplugging power and holding power button down for 10 sec (with PS switch on and off)
- Replacing MB CMOS Battery with new one (Read post of people having similar issue for my MB)
- Clearing CMOS / Reset via buttons on MB
- Powering on via LED Button on MB (When power is attached, the button currently glows orange which is normal - it turns to green when the PC is on I think, but when I press it now it does nothing except briefly makes a clicking sound.  THe MB does have an LCD error code display next to this button, but when trying to power on (or in any other current state) it never displays anything
- Leaving unplugged (with PSswitched on) for about an hour

I've got a top of the line power supply so would hope that it would protect everything else.  It's listing even states "Over-voltage protection, under-voltage protection, and short circuit protection, over power protection, over temperature protection provide maximum safety to your critical system components."  I haven't tried the Fan test button on it yet, but will once home.  Still don't know if it's PS if I know MB is getting at least some power because that Power Button LED comes on.  I just read about the Paperclip Test and plan to do that once home, too.  Also wondering if installation of a new meter causes some sort of different power outage than your everyday storm one.  Wonder if power company did something incorrectly?

So... any ideas or suggestions?   I heavily depend on this server so would like to order parts asap if needed.  Please help!  Thanks!
BzowKAsked:
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CompProbSolvCommented:
I'd be suspicious of the power supply, even though it is a high-quality one.

Disconnect all internal power cables (hard drives, optical drive, etc.) except for the ones to the motherboard and to the video card (if present).  Then hit the power switch on the computer.

If it has the same symptom, I'd try a different power supply.  There is a chance that it is the motherboard, but substituting a power supply is a quick and easy test.  Don't bother bolting it into the chassis, just connect the power cables to the motherboard (likely two of them) and to the video card (if present).
nobusCommented:
i usually start from a minimum config, to eliminate possible causes  read more here :
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Components/Motherboards/A_1945.html                  (Short-overview-of-how-to-troubleshoot-bad-hardware-when-a-pc-does-not-post)

so i would certainly disconnnect all extra disks (the pool) - cd drive etc...leave only the SSD
if still no boot - boot from a live cd, after disconnecting SSD, and reconnecting dVD drive

if you have disk problems  - this can help :
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Storage/Hard_Drives/A_3000-The-bad-hard-disk-problem.html
viki2000Commented:
“I've got a top of the line power supply” – that does not mean is bulletproof.

If you look at the manufacturer site:
http://www.corsair.com/en-us/hxi-series-hx1000i-high-performance-atx-power-supply-1000-watt-80-plus-platinum-certified-psu
under tech specs we see 7 years warranty.
Since how many years do you have it?
How much power do you take with your cards, HDD…? Do you get close to 80%?
If it already passed several years, let’s say 2-3 at your continuously run, the components become old due to temperature.  It is not about passing the limits, but about coming close to them and stress the components with heat. They do not provide a derating curve temperature vs. load.
 But does not matter too much anyway, because as you described the problem, you should be aware of one thing:  it does not matter how expensive is your power supply, a short pulse at the input side, at the wrong moment, may destroy either the internal input fuse or the internal varistor (MOV) which is an electric shock absorber for input inrush current generated by the electrolytic  bulk capacitor. If the MOV goes, usually explodes, then the fuse blows too.
By the way, does your fan run?
I would take a voltmeter from somewhere and measure the 3.3V, +5V, +12V,-12V from output of the power supply without any load connected to it, no mother boards, no cards, no HDD, nothing. Then you know it for sure.
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CompProbSolvCommented:
The voltmeter test with no load may not be fruitful.  Many (most?) computer power supplies assume a minimum load in their design and don't operate properly without such a load.  There are inexpensive ($10-20) testers that will load the supply and give indications with LEDs on the state of each of the supplies.

In any case, it should be quick and easy to test with a known good supply.
viki2000Commented:
Many switchable power supplies with multiple outputs, not necessarily only PC power supplies, require indeed a minimum output current on some channels, but is not always like that.
The detailed specs does not say it:
http://www.corsair.com/~/media/Corsair/download-files/manuals/corsair-psu-spec-table-091813.pdf
The user manual mentions a self-test on page 6 with the fan:
http://www.corsair.com/~/media/Corsair/download-files/manuals/psu/HXi-Manual.pdf
Did you try it?
BzowKAuthor Commented:
I finally found the issue that weekend.  I tried the "paperclip test" on the power supply and the fan did not turn on - however - I also verified that my power supply's fan only comes on as needed so that didn't verify much.

Next, I took the power supply out of another system and tested with it.  It came back up!  I'm submitting the power supply for RMA now.  

Thanks for the suggestions, though, guys!
BzowKAuthor Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 0 points for BenKellermann's comment #a41135426

for the following reason:

It was the only thing that worked...
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
Hi Ben,

I'm simply an independent observer of this question, but your request on how to close it baffles me. You determined that the power supply is the problem:
I took the power supply out of another system and tested with it. It came back up! I'm submitting the power supply for RMA now.
First, CompProbSolv in http:#a41032611 clearly nailed it:
I'd be suspicious of the power supply, even though it is a high-quality one.

I'd try a different power supply. There is a chance that it is the motherboard, but substituting a power supply is a quick and easy test.
Then viki2000 also got it right in http:#a41043268
“I've got a top of the line power supply” – that does not mean is bulletproof.
CompProbSolv's http:#a41032611 is clearly deserving of being an Accepted Solution with the lion's share of the points and viki2000's http:#a41043268 is worthy of being an Assisted Solution with some points.

Just one member's opinion. Regards, Joe

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BzowKAuthor Commented:
I've requested that this question be closed as follows:

Accepted answer: 0 points for BenKellermann's comment #a41135426

for the following reason:

It was the solution
Joe Winograd, Fellow&MVEDeveloperCommented:
Hi thermoduric,
I objected to this the first time around and you made an excellent post on the situation. But here we are again. Now what? I have no interest in this question with respect to points (I don't want any, I don't deserve any), but I strongly believe in fairness at EE, and it is fair for CompProbSolv and viki2000 to get points for their correct responses. Regards, Joe
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