VOIP quality issue: can aboundant bandwidth assure VOIP quality without QoS?

I understand that with QoS the VOIP can assure its voice quality. But unless you have VPN or you cannot enforce QoS throughout the entire connection.  Question to you, is there any way to ensure the voice quality even without using QoS?  For example, simply by allocating way more bandwidth than VOIP needs so the VOIP traffic will not be interfered by other traffic. Would it be possible?
CastlewoodAsked:
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arnoldCommented:
not sure i understand, without QoS, how will you allocate bandwidth?
QoS is what one uses to assign preferential treatment to VOIP (service/ports) traffic as well as reserve bandwidth for that traffic.

Unless one builds their own network, and everyone is connected through it, it is more common to have other providers provide a connection, one can only then manage their side given the common presumption that most IP carriers have their own QoS to have VOIP traffic preferred when they offer VOIP solutions.
All you can do is to make sure your users do not saturate your network connection with data interfering with VOIP/Voice..
DIPRAJCommented:
hi,
if you have UTM/Firewall in your network, then you can segregate VOIP traffic and allow them bandwidth as per system requirement.

create customize services for voip or create service group for voip.
create policy for that service group and allocate bandwidth for the policy.

Thanks.
CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
Sorry for the late response.
We have MPLS among three of our four facilities among different states in the US. You know MPLS is kind of VPN so there is no worry about the VOIP quality since QoS is available. The worry is on that facility without MPLS -- that facility currently uses Comcast.  Since there is no way to have QoS with Comcast connection so we have been thinking if we can simply just purchase more bandwidth say 50M from Comcast even the facility just needs about 20M. So with this abundant bandwidth, can we guarantee the VOIP's voice quality??
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arnoldCommented:
On the router that is in the facility prioritize VOIP voice on the incoming and outgoing side.
Comcast like many broadband providers have voice services which means their network prioritized voice/VoIP traffic over all others.

Often the saturation is on the outgoing side anyway and not so much on the incoming side often because of the outgoing/upload side is commonly has a lower bandwidth compared to the incoming/download side.

What's your Comcast connection bandwidth: 20/6, 20/20, etc.?
Alex BaharCommented:
Hi,
There are 3 main ways of providing quality to your voip calls:
1- Get a reliable connection dedicated to voip only. Think of this like a leased line. Whole bandwidth will be available to voip.
2- Another way of providing quality to your voip calls is to throw in more bandwidth, so that there will never be congestion. Not even data congestion.
3- Manage your traffic using networking QoS techniques. These are mainly queuing, bandwidth management, and prioritisation. Almost all network devices, routers, switches, the IP phones themselves, wireless LAN devices, etc support different QoS mechanisms.

So, the answer is YES. If you can throw in more bandwidth, then it will improve your voice quality without getting into difficult to manage network QoS techniques. These days bandwidth is getting cheaper. Many companies just buy more bandwidth to avoid congestion in the WAN.

I hope this helps.
Regards,
Alex
CastlewoodAuthor Commented:
abahar,

Thank you for your input. You got into something I really want to know more about.  You mentioned:
1- Get a reliable connection dedicated to voip only. Think of this like a leased line.

You know what Comcast is not a lease line. What kind of issues will we run into if we don't use a leased line?

Also you mentioned:
 3- Manage your traffic using networking QoS techniques.

If we use Comcast, you know what, the QoS setting will only take into effect inside our network. It will NOT work as soon as the packets go out of our network. If that is the case, how good would it be?
arnoldCommented:
Use Speedtest.net  to see what your current bandwidth upload/download average is.

When you do not build out your own network, you can control only what leaves your network and what enters it.
The vendor through who. You get your connection also employ qos to handle/prioritize ......

A leased line is more of a term of art. Commonly getting the feed through the local phone company .
These days a feed from a cable, phone company can take different feeds equivalent to leased line..
Alex BaharCommented:
Castlewood
1- Get a reliable connection dedicated to voip only. Think of this like a leased line.
You know what Comcast is not a lease line. What kind of issues will we run into if we don't use a leased line?
- You *may* face typical issues of an oversubcribed and cheaply built public networks. Main issue is congestion. If the distance between your sites are long (e.g. over 3-4 thousand miles) and they are crossing different service providers, then you may also feel the delay (hence jitter). It eventually depends on the path between your sites. In the past I successfully ran VoIP between Australia and Singapore over public internet (IPSEC VPN) for a site with 25 users. This is almost a 7 hour long flight. Both sites had 100 Mbps (public) internet connections.

Up to 200ms delay is reasonable. But jitter should stay under 60-80ms.

Also you mentioned:
 3- Manage your traffic using networking QoS techniques.
If we use Comcast, you know what, the QoS setting will only take into effect inside our network. It will NOT work as soon as the packets go out of our network. If that is the case, how good would it be?
- You can still eliminate congestion on your "exit to internet". Sometimes the "last mile" is the slowest link. Make sure you configure "priority for your voip traffic" towards internet. This will make sure that emails etc will not delay your voip going out.

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