SQL Server Std - OS + best practice

Hi all...

SQL Server 2014 Std BE  / Access 2010 FE

Regarding the OS that SQL server resides on....   So if we are deploying an in house solution that has say 35 users on a lan and 5 remote users does it make any difference the OS that the SQL Server resides on?   Does it need to be a server OS or can i use a std windows 7 / 8.1 etc as the OS?

Is it also best practice to seperate the SQL server away from the main windows server that controls the domain and stores the networked files?

Its just that we are upgrading our main file server in the next few months to a beast of a machine and im wondering if im best in either virtulising the new server or utilising the old server as a SQL server machine only?

Finally has anyone seen much performance gain from using SSD's in the PC that runs the SQL Server?

Many thanks..

Cheers

Steve
SKGLUFCAsked:
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ZberteocCommented:
At that usage I would say that even an express version of SQL would be enough. As far as OS is concerned, there are ideal recommendations but it is not something that would represent a whole lot of difference when it comes to a low usage like that.

The physical storage, be it local hard drive or a SAN configuration, will be always the weakest link when it comes to the overall performance and usually the bottleneck. But again, if the usage is not high enough I don't think the SSD really justify when there are still more classic had drives approaches that will do the job just fine. Of course that the SSDs will perform much better but it is not necessary in this scenario. On the other hand if the money is not a problem then why not... :)

Virtualization. If you will get a "beast" of a machine then it would be kind of waste of resources to be only used with a single purpose, again, under that usage scenario. Beside that there are advantages to virtualization that you do not have with a stand alone machine.

So the answer is that  is relative to what your purpose and usage is and that you can go for different solutions as long as they will fit your needs.
Vitor MontalvãoMSSQL Senior EngineerCommented:
Does it need to be a server OS or can i use a std windows 7 / 8.1 etc as the OS?
SQL Server's performance depends on Memory, CPU, I/O and Network (usually from this order of importance) so the choice of the OS depends on how much of these resources they can provide.


Is it also best practice to seperate the SQL server away from the main windows server that controls the domain and stores the networked files?
Yes, an highly recommend best practice.


im wondering if im best in either virtulising the new server or utilising the old server as a SQL server machine only?
Depends on if the virtual machine can offer better performance than the old physical machine, or not.


Finally has anyone seen much performance gain from using SSD's in the PC that runs the SQL Server?
In most of the cases, yes but once more depends on what your storage solution can offer in terms of performance.

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SKGLUFCAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys for the responses, sorry for the delay in replying, i have had limited emails for the last few weeks while on holiday.

Cheers

Steve
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Microsoft's Non-server OS's usually have connection limits on the order of 10 to 20 users at a time.  I found a table from Microsoft showing the limits but I can't find it right now.
SKGLUFCAuthor Commented:
Thanks Dave..

Yes i remember that from a few years ago when i was running a access be on a std windows OS.  

Thanks

Steve
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