Where is the private ip address 10.1.1.1 from in PC(win8) ?

Hi I notice my pc can ping 10.1.1.1. I do not have additional private network connected with my PC. The PC gate way ip address is 192.168.1.1. After showing route print in the PC, I cannot find any 10.1.1.1 related ip address. Command ipconfig also does not show any of it. Where is it ? Thank you.
eemoonAsked:
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ivan rosaCommented:
you could try identifying the name of the device by...
ping -a 10.1.1.1

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or

nslookup 10.1.1.1

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and do a tracer to see how many hops is it from your PC, this will at least tell your connectivity between parties

tracert 10.1.1.1

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or if you believe that is someone else on the internet maybe connected, there are also websites that will actually attempt to get  you their external IP location
EG.

https://www.whatismyip.com/ip-whois-lookup/
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
If the route is not on your computer, then it's probably on the router.

Have you established a guest WiFi network or a VLAN on your router?

HTH,
Dan
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it_saigeDeveloperCommented:
Agreed with Dan.  This is most likely a double-nat scenario wherein you have your ISP router (10.1.1.1) and your router (192.168.1.1).

You can easily validate if this is indeed the scenario any number of ways; e.g. - Accessing your routers web interface and determining the configuration of the WAN interface.

-saige-
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
I agree with it-saige but I think that's different from what Dan Cracium said.

Here's how it works:

ISP <> modem/router <> your router <> your LAN

As your router LAN side is on subnet 192.168.1.0/24 and has address 192.168.1.1, the WAN side needs an address (that's in a different subnet) to connect to the modem/router.  
We can suppose that the WAN side and the modem/router LAN side are on 10.1.1.0/24.  It's not perhaps the most common selection but certainly not surprising.  So, we'll go with that.

Then, the modem/router LAN side address would appear to be 10.1.1.1 which is VERY common (that a router would have address ".1" as in 10.1.1.1.

When you ping (or address a browser) to 10.1.1.1, the packets will depart your computer, hit your router and, your router will recognize that the packets are destined for it's WAN subnet.  So, it sends them there and launches them out onto the WAN subnet wire with NAT so the source address is an augmented version of your router's WAN port address.  The packets arrive at the modem/router and it responds back out onto its LAN wire which reaches your router WAN, which puts the return packets out onto your LAN and back to your computer - using the "deNATted" address of your computer and application that sent the ping packets.
[I'm sorry if this is a bit terse but I hope you get the idea].

You could open a browser like Internet Explorer and put 10.1.1.1 in the address space.  Then you will probably see the modem/router or at least get a login from it.
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eemoonAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for your reply. and I am sorry for the late reply due to another project.
I tried several ways you mentioned above.  Tracert in my PC gave some info: it had 7 hops to reach 10.1.1.1. It looks like that it went out to WAN. But why it took 7 hops, too many.
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
That looks like some kind of misconfiguration. Are any public IP hops visible in the trace?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
What *is* the traceroute result?
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