Switches and VLANs

I feel a lack of knowledge of switches that have VLAN capability.  I rarely deal with them in the fullest sense and don't have much to experiment with.  About all I've done is to set up a VLAN for the purpose of switch management when the switch might be on a subnet that's removed from the main LAN.

The most common question I see here on EE is about routing between VLANs.  And, I don't know how to combine switch capabilities into my answers.  I can give generic answers but that's about it.

Now, it's easy for me to say that these details are all switch device dependent.  But that's really skirting the issue.  I can only imagine that there are a lot of switch VLAN controls that are more or less common.  

I think I understand about tagging and trunks but have never used either of them.   My sense is that they are important when data is flowing through more than one switch or other device.  Yes?

But, as above, my real question is VLAN-to-VLAN routing.  Is there a common way that this is done?

I don't mind reading but I don't want to waste a whole lot of time in sifting through things that don't get to the point.  So, in addition to your answers, some good links would be great!
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Fred MarshallPrincipalAsked:
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
But, as above, my real question is VLAN-to-VLAN routing.  Is there a common way that this is done?
Not sure I understand what you're looking for as this answer may appear... simplistic.

These days, it's commonly done on multi-layer switches using SVI's. Back in the old days, layer 3 switches (I haven't seen one of those in almost 15 years) or the good old "router on a stick"
JustInCaseCommented:
The most common question I see here on EE is about routing between VLANs.  And, I don't know how to combine switch capabilities into my answers.
my real question is VLAN-to-VLAN routing.
For switch routing, you need to configure few things:
- enable routing on L3 switch (it is off by default)
- create Switch Virtual Interfaces (SVI) for each VLAN
- assign IP address to SVI
- on VLAN hosts - default gateway should be SVI's IP address
That's it for inter VLAN routing on L3 switch.
To reach any IP address range that is not configured on switch default route should be configured to point to next hop router or L3 switch (simplified).
I think I understand about tagging and trunks but have never used either of them.   My sense is that they are important when data is flowing through more than one switch or other device.  Yes?
Yes, but if you created separate VLAN for management (not just create separate IP subnet in one VLAN) you should be using tagging right away between switches, since you can't have 2 separate untagged VLANs on one port, only one VLAN can be untagged between switches. Tagging is inserting 802.1q frame called tag - 4 bytes of data into network frames (to identify VLAN and L2 priority). Frames without 802.1q frame are untagged and belong to native VLAN on link.

Part of confusion is caused by different vendors terminology that is in use for trunk.
Cisco trunk is forwarding multiple VLANs through single port (tagged port at HP world).
IN HP case term trunk (Cisco's Etherchannel) - aggregating multiple links into single link.

For most of articles about L3 switch interVLAN routing there is underlying premise that you already know L2 switching and router on a stick (to use router for inerVLAN traffic. But I hope links below can be helpful.
Configure inter VLAN routing on Cisco L3 switch
Cisco article
Is there a common way that this is done?
Basic principles are the same as above, but implementation from vendors can be slightly different (almost mystic sometimes on links between switches :) but I guess they try to avoid law suits for patents).

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Fred MarshallPrincipalAuthor Commented:
Thank you!  That was it.
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