Is there a way to determine the IP block assigned to a static IP address?

I have a DSL login with a static IP address assigned which has a block of IPs routed to it... (different subnet). Is there any way to identify the subnet assigned to the static IP?
Mike SmithAsked:
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
Well, it depends.  If there's a subnet mask then yes.  Without a subnet mask then maybe not.
What do you mean "has a block of IPs router to it"?
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Mike SmithAuthor Commented:
I mean if my block was 216.58.239.0/28, how would I reverse engineer that information from just the static IP which is it's router?
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
I'm not sure what you mean by "reverse engineer".  The block is:
216.58.239.0: Network address
216.58.239.1 to .14 are the available host addresses - one of which would be the router LAN address if I understand the setup.
216.58.239.15 is the broadcast address.
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Unless you have the netmask, you can't determine how you are subnetted from just an address. An address could be a member of a /28 /24 /16 or even a /8 (and just about everything in between) subnet. If your given address would be the broadcast address for a particular level of subnet, you can eliminate that as a possibility, but not for subnets with shorter netmask.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
But the subnet is /28 so it's clear what the addresses are.  Unless we're talking about something else entirely.  Are we?
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
I'm hoping for more clarity from Teknik_L since the language used seems to be nonstandard.

There are a bunch of IP and subnet calculator websites available, for example,
http://www.subnetonline.com/pages/subnet-calculators/ip-subnet-calculator.php

http://www.subnet-calculator.com/

These can be useful tools for people who haven't quite grokked the binary aspects of IP addresses and subnets. I don't see any of them that specifically answer the question asked here.
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Mike SmithAuthor Commented:
I dont think this is possible... since the static IP is a 255.255.255.252 address and the IP block is a different IP range routed to that static IP.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
I think it could be clearer.  
As an example, here is what I'm used to seeing:
- a "device" for interfacing.  It could be a modem or it could be a router.
- the "outside" (or WAN) side of the device has a static public IP address and subnet mask entered.  This comes from the ISP and is an address in a subnet that they determine and control.
- the "inside" (or LAN) side of the device has a static public IP address that belongs to your assigned block/subnet of public IP addresses.  It becomes the internet gateway address for all of your other devices that will have public IP addresses in your assigned block/subnet.

So, in your questions and statements which one are you talking about?
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jmcgOwnerCommented:
Here's the place where we're having trouble understanding you:
the IP block is a different IP range routed to that static IP
It raises the question "Routed by what means?"

I suppose it's possible that a routing scheme could be set up so that when a request arrives at any port on any IP address in the "different" range, that request is forwarded to your static IP and presented at the same or some other port number. But that kind of routing is entirely programmable and could be arbitrary; there is no fixed rule in general to find the relationship.
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
In http:#aI41264294 you give the answer: You have 255.255.255.252 (/30). Point. Everything behind the router on the other side is different and not related.
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