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Alan Dala

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Layer 2+ vs Layer 3 switch

Hello -

I'm running a small network where I want to implement Qos and 2-3 VLANs. Would it matter if the switches I pick are Layer2+ vs Layer 3? I need to route between VLANs.

Thank you!
Switches / HubsNetwork ArchitectureNetworking Protocols

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TimotiSt
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Predrag Jovic
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When you ask like that it's hard to say, most likely in small environments there would be no big difference between L2+ and L3 switch (except if there is difference in QoS capabilities of the switch), except predicted network grow. If you thing network will grow fast buy L3 switch.
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Alan Dala

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Thank you for your answer. It's still not clear for me what L3 would do for a growing network. What are the issue I could into with a Layer 2+ switch? The obvious reason for taking Layer 2+ in consideration is the price.


Thanks again.
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Switches / Hubs
Switches / Hubs

A switch is a device that filters and forwards packets of data between LAN segments. Switches operate at the data link layer or the network layer of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) Reference Model and therefore support any packet protocol. LANs that use switches to join segments are called switched LANs or, in the case of Ethernet networks, switched Ethernet LANs. A hub is a connection point for devices in a network. Hubs are commonly used to connect segments of a LAN. A hub contains multiple ports; when a packet arrives at one port, it is copied to the other ports so that all segments of the LAN can see all packets.

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