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Date Diff in SQL

Posted on 2016-07-20
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In access would add this to my criteria: > CDate("1/1/" & Year(Now())-1  to get anything greater than 1/1/YYYY.  I need to calculate YTD metrics as well as PY YTD metrics.  

YTD:  1/1/2016-present
PYTD: 1/1/2015-12/31/2015

How can I translate this to SQL?  I need to automate this.
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Question by:gracie1972
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by:Jim Horn
ID: 41721922
Year - CAST(CAST(Year(SomeDate) as char(4)) + '0101' as date)

What's the logic for PYTD?  That can wildly differ from place to place, so check out my article SQL Server Calendar Table which gives you code and a demo on how to pull this off to handle custom periods.
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by:gracie1972
ID: 41721927
For Prior Year I have to include all the dates greater than 1/1/2015.  (Current year - 1).

In access this worked:  > CDate("1/1/" & Year(Now())-1
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by:Paul
ID: 41721934
datediff (year,1,getdate ())
That gives you the number of years from 1901 until this year

Now add that to "year zero" (1900)

dateadd (year, datediff (year,1,getdate ()) ,0)

Which will return a datetime value of:
Jan 1 last year
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by:gracie1972
ID: 41721948
This only returned greater than 1/1/2016, I need for this query to run and by default always go back 1 year, YTD starting at the beginning of the year.  

When I write the where statement like this, I only get > 1/1/2016.
WHERE dbo.VW_Tableau_Sell_Out.[WEEK] > dateadd (year, datediff (year,1,getdate ()) ,0)

If today were 7/19/2017, then the query should return > 1/1/2016, we are trying to automate this. Access cannot work any longer the data pulls are too large.
This worked in Access: WHERE (dbo_VW_Tableau_Sell_Out.WEEK)>CDate("1/1/" & Year(Now())-1)
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Paul earned 2000 total points
ID: 41722164
oops, sorry

===
select  dateadd (year, datediff (year,0,getdate ())-1 ,0)

0 in the formula above represents 1900-01-01

get the datediff, in years, from that 0 date until getdate()
then deduct 1
then add that number of years to the zero date

e.g.  if getdate() is in the year 2016, the returned date would be 2015-01-01

=== e.g. === to get all data for the previous year
select *
from some_table
where datetime_col >= dateadd (year, datediff (year,0,getdate ())-1 ,0) -- 1st Jan prev year
and datetime_col <  dateadd (year, datediff (year,0,getdate ()) ,0) -- 1st Jan this year
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by:gracie1972
ID: 41723377
Thank you!
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