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Expand disk drive Windows 2008 R2

Posted on 2016-07-22
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Last Modified: 2016-11-22
Our Dell server with mirror drives, has a 2 physical drives with two logical patricians (C: & D:). We are at 96% full and need to expand volume C: drive. I can move the volume D: data to a backup drive Would like to know the best method expanding volume C:?
What I have read, it is best to shrink volume D: and then expand volume C:
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Question by:deanind
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6 Comments
 
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Eric C earned 500 total points
ID: 41725331
first of all, take a full backup of everything.

if you've reclaimed the space that was being used by D, then it's easy to expand C.

1. On the server, go to Server Manager
2. Expand 'Storage'
3. Click on 'Disk Management'
4. Right-click on C and select select 'Extend Volume'
5. Specify the new size. (you can use all of the available space if you want)
6. That's it. Now reboot the server and you'll find the C drive is bigger.
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Expert Comment

by:Bill Bach
ID: 41725336
Do you have room for more physical drives?  Do you have a true RAID controller or software raid?  The "best" solution depends on knowing a lot more about your environment.

Assuming that you have room for two more drives, and assuming that you have a RAID controller, I would add two more physical drives to the box as another RAID1 pair big enough for your data volume.  Once you create the volume, migrate the data from the D: drive to it and move all of the shares over to it as well.  Once this part is done, you can destroy the old D: drive (and, optionally, reassign E: to D:).  

Having moved the regular data out of your way, you can delete the partition on the D: drive.  Then, you can extend your current C: drive to take up the remaining space that was taken up by the old D: drive.

By the way, you WILL want to clean up anything that you can (before starting all of this) to reduce the size of the data set.  Delete any temp data, run the Disk Cleanup tool, and make sure that anything else you don't need is purged out.  You will ALSO want to get a full backup (preferably an image backup), too.
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Author Comment

by:deanind
ID: 41725367
Thank You for the comments. We have hardware mirror drives, 545 GB each, these are SCSI. Logical drive C: was set at 40GB, the balance is D: drive holding company data. This worked for 3 years and I am thinking about expanding C: to 100 GB. This I believe should be more than enough.

Our accounting system is best run on SCSI D: drive and I can keep the accounting data on D:. The archive data can be located on the spare drive, speed is not the primary issue.

Bill, I appreciate your comments but at this time do not think we need to add additional drives.
Eric, since C: cannot be expanded, I believe D: should be reduced by 60GB and then I can expand C: from 40 to 100 GB? Then follow your instructions.
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Expert Comment

by:Eric C
ID: 41725371
Correct. You need to have free space on the drive before you can expand C.

If you are able to shrink volume D (try the Disk Management' in Storage Manager), then reboot, then you can expand C.
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Author Comment

by:deanind
ID: 41741068
We copied all the data off of D: to another drive and then formatted D: to free space. When we try to expand C:, this option is greyed out. There is free space after C: to expand, it appears that the C: patrician cannot be expanded using Storage Management.

We are now looking to use Partition Master or similar 3rd party software to expand the partition. What can you suggest?

We did reboot after formatting D: to free space, refer to this comment. Would this have made a difference?

"If you are able to shrink volume D (try the Disk Management' in Storage Manager), then reboot, then you can expand C."
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Author Comment

by:deanind
ID: 41741077
Correction - we did NOT reboot after formatting D:
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