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How can I see the NAT translation of http packets from/to my laptop's private ip with internet

Just curious: I understand that my router does NAT between my private home network and the internet.  How can I see/follow what happens when I enter a website's url into my browser?

I've got Fiddler installed - will this show me, or do I need wireshark?
I'm trying to see things like how my Internet router tags http packets so that it know how to route return packets to my laptop's nic vs. the virtual nic in a virtual machine running on my laptop which is also using the laptop's nic to get internet access.
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SAbboushi
Asked:
SAbboushi
2 Solutions
 
AkinsdNetwork AdministratorCommented:
Wireshark may be able to capture the information. Filter for NAT traffic to view activities
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AlexBlinovCommented:
It is better to see on the router. Do you have console access to your router?
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
It is not even better but required to use packet capture and the like on the router. After applying NAT you can not see the original IP addresses anymore when looking at the packets.
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
>> Wireshark may be able to capture the information. Filter for NAT traffic to view activities
Can anyone confirm this?

>> It is better to see on the router. Do you have console access to your router?
Yes (Arris/Motorola NVG589)

Qlemo: sorry - I did not understand what you mean
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
I do not know how to say it better.

NAT changes one or both of source and destinatiion IP (and probably the ports, too).
If you run a packet capture on anything different from the device performing NAT, you do not see anything of relevance, because you either see the untranslated or the translated packet, but never both.
You need the NAT table of the NAT device to have a correlation between non-tranlsated and tranlsated packet.

The router (resp. the NAT device) has complete knowledge about the packet. Nothing else does. A router usually allows for listing the table, log NAT operation and so on. So it should be the single point of information you need.
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  I've found the router NAT table.  It shows sessions for each ip address on my private network.

I'm running a guest OS in VirtualBox on the laptop configured to use my laptop's wireless nic.

My suspicion is that the NAT table of my router connected to the internet would have separate sessions for when my laptop (i.e. the host) OS is browsing the internet vs. when the VirtualBox guest OS is browsing the internet, right?  How would I differentiate between those sessions in the NAT table?
NAT-Table.png
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Both machines should have different IP addresses, so that is how you can differ between those.
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
Sorry - I seem to be missing something.

As I understand it, the NAT table for my router (connected to the internet) shows ip addresses on my private network.  A virtual machines on my computer is not on that private network: for a VM to communicate with the internet, VirtualBox needs to pass traffic through my computer's NIC card.   That NIC card is assigned only ONE ip address by my router.  So that router's NAT table only shows sessions associated with my computer, whether the packets are originating from my (host) computer's browser  or the VM's browser.

In summary, my computer and the VM share one NIC with the same ip address.

So I'm still trying to figure out:
How, in the NAT table, would I differentiate between internet browsing sessions on my computer vs. on a VM since they are both using the same NIC / ip address?  Will any of the columns in the table I posted earlier help me answer this question?
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QlemoBatchelor, Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Your VM should have an own IP address. Yes, it is using the physical NIC of the host, but virtual it is a different NIC.
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