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surface mount resistors

Posted on 2016-07-24
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Last Modified: 2016-07-24
I am trying to repair a circuit board where several of the surface mount resistors have come lose.
I am trying measure the resistance, but the measured values don't quite match what is stamped on top.

The resistors that have "180" on top, almost exactly have that as a measured resistance ohms.

The resistors that have a value of "510" stamped on top, have a measured value of "50".
Is there a implied decimal point ??
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Question by:sidwelle
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41726835
Is there another resistor of the same stated value to measure?  Unless there is a K or M or some other marking, you would expect the resistor in question to be 510 ohms, just like the 180 ohm resistor. There is not a standard for printed values but markings usually make it clear.

You need either a comparable resistor or manufacturer spec sheet to be sure.
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by:funwithdotnet
ID: 41726851
Ignoring measurement technique- a number may match or be totally unrelated to resistance. You can't count on it. Even a match can have quite a bit of tolerance.  *If the package is not charred or damaged and is connected properly, there is a 99%+ chance that it will work properly, regardless of the measurement. *A rule of thumb from way back in my circuit component troubleshooting & repair days.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41726853
Mostly today, numbers on a component have meaning. This is true for the stuff in my shop downstairs..
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funwithdotnet earned 250 total points
ID: 41726855
I forgot ... 510 = 51 ohms.
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by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 250 total points
ID: 41726858
So then why is the "180" ohm resistor measuring 180 ohms. A given manufacturer would use the same numbering technique (which may not be standard).
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by:sidwelle
ID: 41726864
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41726872
Thanks. It is always the spec sheet that will tell you.
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