C++ to C# code conversion issue

I am trying to convert the following C++ code into C#.

I found the following C++ code KnightSequences

typedef enum          { _A,_B,_C,_D,_E,_F,_G,_H,_I,_J,_K,_L,_M,_N,_O,_1,_2,_3 } TKeyIdentity;
typedef std::vector<TKeyIdentity const>     TKeyPath;
typedef std::vector<TKeyPath const>         TKeyMap;

const TKeyPath keyPadRoot =
{
    _A, _B, _C, _D, _E, _F, _G, _H, _I, _J, _K, _L, _M, _N, _O, _1, _2, _3
}

const TKeyMap keyPad =
{
    { _H, _L },         // A
    { _I, _K, _M },     // B
    { _F, _J, _L, _N }, // C
    { _G, _M, _O },     // D
    { _H, _N },         // E    
    { _C, _M, _1 },     // F  (_1) not valid for 2 moves followed by 1 move rule
    { _D, _N, _2 },     // G
    { _A, _E, _K, _O, _1, _3 }, // H
    { _B, _L, _2 },     // I
    { _C, _M, _3 },     // J  (_3) not valid for 2 moves followed by 1 move rule
    { _B, _H, _2 },     // K
    { _A, _C, _I, _3 }, // L
    { _B, _D, _F, _J }, // M
    { _C, _E, _G, _1 }, // N
    { _D, _H, _2 },     // O (oh)
    { _F, _H, _N },     // 1
    { _G, _I, _K, _O }, // 2 (_K) & (_O) not valid for 2 moves followed be 1 move rule
    { _H, _J, _L }      // 3
};
TraverseKeyPaths( TKeyPath const &keyPath, int pressesRemaining, int vowelsAllowed )
{
 foreach (TKeyIdentity pressedKey in Enum.GetValues(typeof(TKeyIdentity)))
  {
	int value =  TraverseKeyPaths( keyPad[ pressedKey ],pressesRemaining, vowelsAllowed - isVowel[pressedKey] );
  }

}

Open in new window


My C# code:

  enum TKeyIdentity { _A, _B, _C, _D, _E, _F, _G, _H, _I, _J, _K, _L, _M, _N, _O, _1, _2, _3 };
  List<string> keyPadRoot = new List<string> { "_A", "_B", "_C", "_D", "_E", "_F", "_G", "_H", "_I", "_J", "_K", "_L", "_M", "_N", "_O", "_1", "_2", "_3" };

  string[] A = new string[] { "_H", "_L" }; //A
  string[] B = new string[] { "_I", "_K", "_M" }; //B
  .
  .
  .
  etc

 List<string> keyPadMoves = new List<string>(););

 keyPadMoves.AddRange(A);
 keyPadMoves.AddRange(B);
 .
 .
 .
etc

int TraverseKeyPaths(List<string> keyPadRoot, int pressesRemaining, int vowelsAllowed)
{
 	foreach (TKeyIdentity pressedKey in Enum.GetValues(typeof(TKeyIdentity)))
	{
		int value =  value = TraverseKeyPaths(keyPadRoot, pressesRemaining, vowels);
	}
}

Open in new window


The following C# code is not working like C++ code.
int value =   TraverseKeyPaths(keyPadRoot, pressesRemaining, vowels);

Please let me know how to pass the correct argument.
Thanks for your help.
HPFE455Asked:
Who is Participating?
 
sarabandeConnect With a Mentor Commented:
actually std::vector cannot be initialized with an initialiser list in c++. so your source code would not compile (with c++). initialiser lists within {.., ..} only can be used for native type arrays or struct/class without an explicit constructor (and without class members with an explicit constructor).

the only way to init a std::vector with more than one different values is to using a c array as a helper:

static const int arr[] = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
static const int arrsize = (int)(sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]));
std::vector<int> v(&arr[0], &arr[arrsize));

Open in new window


that doesn't help for your 'table' since the lengths of 'rows' were different.

you would need to create a helper struct to come out of this:

enum TKeyIdentity { NIL=-1, _A,_B,_C,_D,_E,_F,_G,_H,_I,_J,_K,_L,_M,_N,_O,_1,_2,_3, KIM };

struct KeyPadInit
{
      int                    nkeys;
      TKeyIdentity  keys[6];   // need a fixed size of arr
};

Open in new window


then you can do (in c++)

const   KeyPadInit kpi[] =
{
    { 2, { _H, _L, NIL, NIL, NIL, NIL, } },         // A
    { 3, { _I, _K, _M, NIL, NIL, NIL,  }},     // B
    { 4, { _F, _J, _L, _N , NIL, NIL, }}, // C
    // ... and so on
};

typedef std::vector<KeyPadInit>  TKeyMap;
TKeyMap keyPad(&kpi[0], &kpi[KIM]);

Open in new window


unfortunately, i don't know whether you have similar possibilities in c#.

Sara
0
 
phoffricCommented:
I don't see what error or runtime problem you have.
I recommend that you post (or edit your OP) showing t a tiny program that can be built and run. If you cannot compile, then indicate the line and error message. If you are able to build it, but get the wrong answer, then indicate what you got and what you expect (and maybe even why you expect it).
0
 
sarabandeCommented:
You probably should delete the question if there was no response from the Author.

The question was about porting of code from C++ to C#, but unfortunately the C++ code given is not valid (doesn't compile). That's why I posted code which solved the issue for C++ but is not a solution for C#.

In my opinion it makes little sense to go on without the participation of the Author.

Sara
0
 
HPFE455Author Commented:
your comments helped to resolve the issue
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.