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ideal datacentre temperature

Posted on 2016-08-05
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Last Modified: 2016-08-09
I used to work in DCs which set their temp to 18-21 Celsius and a few sites recommend this lower temp too

We are auditing one 'green' hosting DC which set temperature at 26 Celsius.

At this temp, are servers more likely to overheat n parts break down?

Whats the practices out there?
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Question by:sunhux
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by:bigeven2002
bigeven2002 earned 110 total points
ID: 41745102
Hello,
In my previous datacenter experience, the room was very cold, along the 18 degree Celsius range.  I go by Fahrenheit though so that is 64 degrees for me.  26 degree celsius is 78 degrees Fahrenheit which may seem warm to a lot of people.  In my home lab, I run at 78 degrees and my equipment is stable, but it is idle most of the time.

How many servers will you be placing there?  How often are they at high CPU and I/O usage?  Is the proposed rackspace room shared with other subscribers?  If so, their equipment might make it a slight concern with 26 Celsius.  If your servers already have good active cooling, I think you may be ok.
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dbrunton earned 250 total points
ID: 41745154
Some companies like Google run their centres at high temperatures.  See http://www.geek.com/chips/googles-most-efficient-data-center-runs-at-95-degrees-1478473/ for example.  Also see http://www.datacenterknowledge.com/archives/2008/10/14/google-raise-your-data-center-temperature/ for an explanation of why they do this.

Simply explained, higher temperatures means less power needed for cooling.  Profit.

However you still need to design the centre to make sure you have adequate cooling and airflow and that the parts do not break down.  Are the parts likely to break down more often?  Google doesn't think so.
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by:sunhux
ID: 41745666
Not sharing w other subscribers.  It has 11x9 racks.  Cant really say how much are the cpu n io utilizations
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by:bigeven2002
ID: 41745769
Ok thanks for the update.  That means you'll have more control in that environment as far as the setup and you can optimize your equipment for power saving or balanced which will produce less heat which in turn would be more compatible to the warmer room temps.  So honestly I think the 26 degree setup will be fine since it will be your equipment only.
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by:andyalder
andyalder earned 140 total points
ID: 41746135
You are sharing with other subscribers unless you rent out every rack in the colo. In a "normal" hot aisle / cold aisle DC the air comes from the floor plenum into the cold aisle, through the servers and out the top of the hot aisle, if the rack next to yours has huge holes left in it then the cold air intended for your rack goes through their holes rather than through your servers. Obviously the hotter the cooling air is in this situation the more critical it is for neighbouring racks to be configured properly.

I would suspect that rather than hot aisle / cold aisle they employ dedicated per-rack cooling, this uses racks with solid doors and a larger gap at the front with the cooling air fed into the front gap, then through the servers and ducted out the top. If the rack next to yours doesn't have the holes filled with blanking plates it's their kit that overheats, not yours.

I must admit I've never heard of an 11x9 rack and Google doesn't list such a thing either.

As to the ideal temperature for your kit you'll have to look up the manufacturer's ambient temperature spec, most modern kit is OK with 26 degrees but some older stuff doesn't have big enough heat sinks for that, especially if one has fallen off or the thermal paste has degraded.
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