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SQL Select

Posted on 2016-08-08
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Last Modified: 2016-08-15
Hello, in my table, I need to get text after DBA

for example, sometimes the string will be:   dba:Test123
sometimes :  dba: testing
sometimes:  DBA testing 1234

so in the strings, its not always the same, you have  " : "  sometimes not, sometimes just a space...

how can I do the select based on those rules ?  to sbstring only what is afer
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Question by:PhilippeRenaud
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ScottPletcher earned 250 total points
ID: 41747791
SELECT SUBSTRING(string, CHARINDEX('DBA', string) + 3, 8000)

That will show the entire string if 'DBA' does not appear.
If instead you  want to show an empty string if 'DBA' does not appear in the original string, then do this:

SELECT SUBSTRING(string, CHARINDEX('DBA', string + 'DBA') + 3, 8000)
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by:PhilippeRenaud
ID: 41747803
it doest work... : if I do :

  SELECT SUBSTRING('DBA: Test', CHARINDEX('DBA', 'DBA: Test' + 'DBA') + 1, 8000)

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it gives me :

BA: Test
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Assisted Solution

by:Olaf Doschke
Olaf Doschke earned 250 total points
ID: 41747856
Because you didn't add 3, as Scott suggested. With +1 you only skip the D of DBA. As you want to skip the three characters D, B, and also A, you have to add 3 to the index position CHARINDEX returns, as it returns the start position of the string searched, not the end position.

Bye, Olaf.
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by:ScottPletcher
ID: 41747933
Sorry, I originally used "+1" and later corrected it to "+3" ... was hoping to get it updated before anyone saw the original :).
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by:Olaf Doschke
ID: 41747948
That explains it. Nevertheless not impossible to figure out, once you look up what CHARINDEX means.

Bye, Olaf.
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by:Sharath
ID: 41749369
Do you have DBA repeated in your column? If not, you can try like this.
declare @table table (string varchar(100))
insert @table values ('dba:Test123'),('DBA testing 1234')

select ltrim(replace(replace(string, 'dba:',''),'dba','')) from @table

-- Test123
-- testing 1234

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