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Windows Server 2003 / Domain and Remote Desktop to PCs on LAN

Posted on 2016-08-09
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Last Modified: 2016-08-15
I've inherited a Windows Server 2003 LAN (Domain environment) with several PCs to help support.  Am currently trying to understand how Remote Desktop works in the environment.

We've got a Comcast gateway with several dedicated ip addresses.  Examining the Gateway settings, there's nothing set for port forwarding or DMZ, so I suspect that Windows Server 2003 is forwarding incoming Remote Desktop connections to PC's on the LAN?

One of the dedicated ip addresses is assigned to the WAN port of the Gateway.  I am able to use rdp to remotely access (Remote Desktop connection over the internet) to the server using one of the other (i.e. "2nd") dedicated ip addresses.  Appending a port # to the address connects me instead to a PC on the LAN.

ipconig /all on server shows 2 vmware adapters and a physical NIC

Where else can I look / diagnostics I can run to understand how Remote Desktop is configured for the LAN?

Can't figure out what interface the "2nd" ip address is bound to or where the port forwarding is configured for incoming Remote Desktop connections.

Appreciate help pointing me in the right direction.  Thanks-
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Question by:SAbboushi
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7 Comments
 
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Accepted Solution

by:
Lee W, MVP earned 250 total points
ID: 41749892
You should be looking at the router to see its configuration - if people RDP to workstations, then there's probably a series of port forwards that will tell you this.

Other possibility is that the server is Small Business Server which can provide a gateway of sorts to connect to the remote PCs that way.
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Assisted Solution

by:Jambon316
Jambon316 earned 250 total points
ID: 41750169
the IP address to remote in to specific machines inside your network will be set by port forwarding on your router, it'll be done by using your routers public facing IP address then a colon then the port set up on the router to trigger the  redirect, on your router there will be some sort of rule set that directs traffic in on that port number to an internal IP on port 3389

so IP address 999.999.999.999:3350 (yes I know that would never be a real IP)would come in to the router on 3350, there would be a port forward set on the  router to redirect any traffic  on 3350 to the specified internal IP on port 3389 (the rdp port)

you'll also need to reserve the internal IP in the dhcp console on the server and make sure the target PC uses the same internal IP everytime..

I don't think server 2003  had any software port forwarding features built in   so I'm pretty sure the forwarding will be configured  on the routers admin panel page. unfortunately I have no idea what or where you should for as comcast aren't really a thing in the UK.
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Author Comment

by:SAbboushi
ID: 41751113
Thanks, but as I said, router setup shows no port forwarding is being done by the router.
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LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 41751472
Unless your 2003 server acting as a router, it's not on the server.  Turn the server off and then try to access via RDP using the IP.  If you connect, it's DEFINITELY not the server.

Replace the Gateway with a standard router can you still get in?  

I'm not familiar with comcast gateways, but some systems have different sections that don't always make immediate sense for port forwarding.
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LVL 5

Expert Comment

by:Jambon316
ID: 41751960
if you could maybe bless us with some kind of model # for the router / gateway or even some screen shots of the user interface, it would be much easier to assist you here...

also on the server, go into the dhcp snap-on console and see if any IP addresses have been reserved matching up with PC you can remote into
1
 

Author Comment

by:SAbboushi
ID: 41753129
Thanks for the help folks.

; )     May blessings be upon you:

SMC 8014 Gateway

No reservations in DHCP (attached)
No port forwarding in gateway/router (attached)
dhcp.png
Gateway.PNG
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:SAbboushi
ID: 41756789
Thanks for your help.  I was onsite a few days ago: there is indeed a (second) router connected to the Comcast gateway: that's where the port forwarding is being done.

Thanks again--
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