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Exchange 2013 - Large mail.que file but get-queue reports zero?

Posted on 2016-08-10
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Got this on a few of mailbox servers. LArge mail.que file (sometimes as big as 10Gb) yet get-queue reports 0 items waiting to be processed.

Is this right?
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Question by:paulfoel
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by:Kimputer
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10 GB is normal for about 50-60 users.
5 GB for about 30 users.

So yes, don't worry.
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by:Schnell Solutions
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Yeap.

It is that at some point in time there were many messages in your queue, as far as these messages are stored in the .que file it took that size. Later your queue normalized, but the point is that the .que file increments its size each time that it needs more space, but it does not free up the physical disk that it took before.

So, you have a relatively big file with just a few messages inside.

There you have many options...

a) Probably it is the normal size that your .que file grow under normal operations. Therefore, you can just leave it like this, there are just empty spaces inside that DB file, when the system requires it, then it will be consumed.

b) Assuming that you had a temporal issue, where there was a problem and many messages were queued, and that was the reason why your .que files took that size. Then you can reduce the .que file size, one method of doing it is defragmenting the .que file. It is done in the same way that you make it with the .ese files of your exchange database files. (Using eseutil)
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ID: 41750547
In case that you want to defrag, here is the process:

1. Dismount the Transport Queue DB stopping the Microsoft Exchange Transport Service (It will allow you to make a maintenance on your file. However, be aware that this server is not going to route messages while your maintenance is in place).

2. Defragment your file using eseutil:
Eseutil /d "c:\program files\exchange server\TransportRoles\data\queue\mail.que"
(This example is assuming that your file is located at the default location, if this is not the case you just need to change the path).

3. Start the Microsoft Exchange Transport Service.
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