MS15-011 - UNC hardening clarification?

Hello I am looking into better securing my Windows domain environment by following the steps per MS15-011 (KB3000483), where you use UNC hardening in Group Policy to specify the UNC paths domain workstations can connect to.

I'm a bit confused -- are you only suppose to add UNC paths to your domain controllers?
Or does this mean you're supposed to add any potential UNC path for any server, that any potential domain workstation or server could possible connect to (like a file share or anything else)?

Or is this only UNC path for Workstations pointing to Domain controller for group policy retrieval?

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3000483
garryshapeAsked:
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
Recommended at minimum sysvol and netlogon shares
We recommend that all NETLOGON and SYSVOL shares be configured to require both mutual authentication and integrity in order to help secure Group Policy against spoofing and tampering attacks that can be leveraged to achieve remote code execution.

Hardened UNC paths
Value name      Value
\\*\NETLOGON      RequireMutualAuthentication=1, RequireIntegrity=1
\\*\SYSVOL      RequireMutualAuthentication=1, RequireIntegrity=1

if you use \\server\* it will apply to all shares on that server \\*\sharename will apply to all shares with that sharename in the domain.

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garryshapeAuthor Commented:
I guess I'm just wondering if I also need to manually add in an entry for file shares.
Like \\file01.domain.com\share1 ,share 2, etc.

Or the SCCM server for software deployments, or WSUS.

Or does this GPO not apply to UNC paths users may be accessing from their computer for things like that?
Only GPO's for computers?
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
if it is not specified it doesn't apply

if you want to protect
\\file01.domain.com\share1
\\file01.domain.com\share2
\\file01.domain.com\share3 ...
use the setting \\file01.domain.com\* and the settings you want this will be the default for that server
McKnifeCommented:
Recommended to do it anywhere, but definitely recommended for domain controller shares as mentioned.
But the most important thing is found here:
Note: SMB Encryption is supported by the SMB client only on Windows 8, Windows Server 2012, and later versions, and then only when communicating with SMB Encryption-capable servers (such as Windows 8, Windows Server 2012 and later versions). If you configure RequirePrivacy=1 on clients that do not support SMB Encryption or for UNC paths hosted by servers that do not support SMB Encryption, you will have a configuration in which the SMB client will be unable to access the specified path.
That simply means, if you have server 2008/2008R2 as server (or win7 or lower as client) and you try to set RequirePrivacy=1, then those shares are no longer accessible! The other two can be set, but if on 2008 (or, at the client side on xp/vista/7), avoid RequirePrivacy=1.
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Windows Server 2008

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