SQL UPDATE statement not working as expected

We run the following statement and even though the correct set of records was being chosen by the FROM statement the SET statement was only working on random records. Why?

UPDATE tblOrder
SET tblOrder.Archive = 0
FROM            dbo.tblAllocationDetail INNER JOIN
                         dbo.tblOrder ON dbo.tblAllocationDetail.lngInvoiceTanID = dbo.tblOrder.lngOrderID
WHERE        (dbo.tblAllocationDetail.lngAllocationID IN
                             (SELECT        tblAllocationDetail_1.lngAllocationID
                               FROM            dbo.tblOrder AS tblOrder_1 INNER JOIN
                                                         dbo.tblAllocationDetail AS tblAllocationDetail_1 ON tblOrder_1.lngOrderID = tblAllocationDetail_1.lngInvoiceTanID
                               WHERE        (tblOrder_1.Archive = 0)))

AND (dbo.tblOrder.Archive = 1)
Adapt2NLAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Vitor MontalvãoConnect With a Mentor MSSQL Senior EngineerCommented:
Why do you need the subselect?
UPDATE tblOrder
SET tblOrder.Archive = 0
FROM dbo.tblAllocationDetail 
    INNER JOIN dbo.tblOrder ON dbo.tblAllocationDetail.lngInvoiceTanID = dbo.tblOrder.lngOrderID
WHERE dbo.tblOrder.Archive = 1

Open in new window

0
 
Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
You're goign to have to define 'correct set' and 'random records' for us, preferably with some sample data, as experts here cannot connect to your data source(s) and run queries so it is not obvious to us.

Offhand the T-SQL syntax looks correct, athought it does seem odd that tables tblOrder and tblAllocationDetail are used both in the JOIN clause and in a WHERE..IN subquery.
0
 
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
I think you should read up this article to rewrite your sql:
https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/1517/UPDATES-with-JOIN-for-everybody.html
0
Keep up with what's happening at Experts Exchange!

Sign up to receive Decoded, a new monthly digest with product updates, feature release info, continuing education opportunities, and more.

 
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
Always UPDATE a table alias -- rather than the full table name -- when a JOIN is used in the UPDATE; otherwise SQL can get "confused" about what to update.  For example, see below.  Besides, table aliases make the code vastly easier to read and maintain anyway.


UPDATE o
SET Archive = 0
FROM            dbo.tblAllocationDetail ad INNER JOIN
                         dbo.tblOrder o ON ad.lngInvoiceTanID = o.lngOrderID
WHERE        (ad.lngAllocationID IN
                             (SELECT        ad_1.lngAllocationID
                               FROM            dbo.tblOrder AS o_1 INNER JOIN
                                                         dbo.tblAllocationDetail AS ad_1 ON o_1.lngOrderID = ad_1.lngInvoiceTanID
                               WHERE        (od_1.Archive = 0)))
AND (o.Archive = 1)
2
 
Jason clarkDBA FreelancerCommented:
take a look at this helpful article Update from Select in SQL Server
0
 
Adapt2NLAuthor Commented:
Thank you for your answers. We eventually discovered that the updates themselves changed the data in such a way that the result set became different to expectations. So it turns out that the SQL statements were OK; our complete understanding of the data was not!
0
 
Pawan KumarDatabase ExpertCommented:
@Author - Could you please close this.
0
 
Pawan KumarDatabase ExpertCommented:
Question is closed.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.