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Our ISP called and said we need to update our DNS addresses

I am not sure what this means.   Does this mean our DNS addresses in our Domain Controller or router?   Is this something on the outside of our LAN?  We are running Windows Server 2008 R2.  If it is in the server, where is this located?
4 Solutions
MacleanSystem EngineerCommented:
Im assuming DNS forwarders on your Domain Controller under Administrative Tools >> DNS.
I figure that the router is taking DHCP, best to check with the network admin & the Domain Admin to avoid making mistakes, but the windows DNS server tool is straight forward.

From memory:

Just connect to DNS, Right click your zone >> properties DNS Forwarders

Replace old ISP DNS name with new DNS name (or IP)

Click OK. Restart DNS Server via services (See administrative tools).

EDIT: I quickly googled it. 1st result straight to MS article here
Double check with your ISP, by calling THEM instead of the other way around.
These changes are quite important and need to be on their website, on normal mail and official company mail paper, and possible through your email registered there.
If you don't verify, you might be falling for a nice trap (compromised DNS servers can do harm!)
Wayne HerbertIT SpecialistCommented:
You definitely need to call them back and find out what that means.  While others are answering with respect to changes in your domain controller, your question is ambiguous enough that your ISP might be referring to their domain name servers that must be maintained by your registrar as the authoritative source.

For example, if your site is being hosted at InMotionHosting, the authoritative name servers for your domain will be ns.inmotionhosting.com and ns2.inmotionhosting.com.  If your ISP changes the names of the DNS servers, and you don't update with your domain registrar, your site will soon not be able to be found.
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Daniel McAllisterPresident, IT4SOHO, LLCCommented:
It sounds to me like one of the following things is going on:

 a) You have a static IP address and your ISP is forcing that to change (sometimes required because of equipment changeouts). As a result, any DNS entry you might have for your domain that points to YOUR IP ADDRESS may need to be updated to the new address.

 b) More likely (given the nature of your question), your ISP provides web and/or email hosting for you, but they do NOT control your DNS (for most people, your REGISTRAR [e.g.: register.com, godaddy.com, or IT4SOHO.net] controls your DNS). They (your ISP) are about to make a change (moving your mail server address, moving your webserver address, or some such) and you will need to make a DNS change (at your registrar) to accommodate this change.

 c) It is also possible that your ISP is handling all of this INCLUDING your DNS -- and that they are changing the DNS server information... well, just like in b above, you're going to need to login to your registrar's site and change the data to meet the new requirement of the ISP.

NOTE: This is a PERFECT example of why small businesses NEED to hire a someone to manage their IT infrastructure. Too small for a salaried professional? Hire a consultant! You only pay when something goes wrong or needs to change. Your consultant will know INSTANTLY that the message you got about your "listing expiring" is actually an ad for SEO optimization, or SPAM trying to BAIT you into moving your registration to a new registrar. In this case, your consultant would be the one calling the ISP for clarification and coordinating the changing data (or the one who determines that it is a phishing scam and you don't need to do ANYTHING!).

With apologies to the technically oriented "sales guy" who serves as your "Computer Guy" in the office, just because someone can spell computer without using the letter K (more than twice), does not mean they really know computing or IT! Just because I know where my pancreas is, and what it does for me, doesn't mean I'm an Endocrinologist -- and you shouldn't really take advise from me on controlling your diabetes!

CAUTION: As Kimputer alludes to above, you should NEVER accept "at face value" the word of someone who calls YOU!

I hope this helps!

syssolutAuthor Commented:
I will be calling the ISP for clarification and let you know.
Daniel McAllisterPresident, IT4SOHO, LLCCommented:
Please give us an update and/or close the question.


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