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How to manage Windows 10 updates

Posted on 2016-08-14
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Last Modified: 2016-08-17
We have a W10 computer that is used by a non profit group with several users.  Only one has Admin rights.  All other users do not.  How can   we be sure that W10 updates are only done when the Admin user wants them done?

It is my understanding that Windows 10 updates are done in one of two modes: "automatic" or "scheduled". My initial selection for this non profit was "automatic".  the computer is only turned off once a week for a refresh.  All non Admin users are instructed to "logoff" only and not shut down the system.  However, I think someone may have accidentally changed this to "scheduled" which appears to have caused some of the users now being prompted by the computer as to whether it is a good time to do Windows 10 updates. So the first question is can a non-administrator make such a change? If so, it would likely explain part of our problem?  If the updates are set to "scheduled" and if no selections were made, would the computer turn itself off after a certain period?   Bottom line, we want complete control of updates to be the Admin's responsibility.  How do we do that?
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Question by:tonyadam
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41755817
If these are OEM Pro or less, you cannot manage updates except that you can set updates to Defer for a limited amount of time (within a 2 or 3 week period). But you cannot delay indefinitely. Windows 10 is much changed in this regard.

You need to schedule around Patch Tuesday and that should help you a great deal.
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by:tonyadam
ID: 41755891
This is a relatively new Lenovo desktop that originally came with W8.1 and we upgraded it to W10 Home...I think.  Apparently, it wouldn't matter according to your comment.  

Is this a possible solution?  Defer update installations for say 10 days. I'm assuming from your comment that there is a way to do this in Settings.   Have the ADMIN user review all updates  that are ready to install once a week and he/she takes the option to install them.  If a shutdown is required because of the update, then the ADMIN user will be there to ensure  that the update is successful and that the system will power back up without errors.    We don't want non ADMIN users installing updates or changing any settings that would allow updates to be installed.  Again, there is only one ADMIN user for this desktop.  There are however, at least 4 or 5 users who logon to use the system's applications.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41756160
To schedule, Start Settings, Updates, Advanced Options, Defer Updates and then use Learn More to determine how you can use scheduling. I think you need to be Admin to set this.

Selective Updates is much more difficult. I have found you can only hide an update if it will not install.

You can use wushowhide.diagcab to hide updates

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3073930

Look at Updates, set Active Hours to determine when updates will be able to install.
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by:tonyadam
ID: 41757253
John, this is a W10 Home system.  Therefore, "defer" is not an option.  I understand defer is only an option in Professional.  

Does anyone know if W10 Home will power itself off after doing updates but then does not power itself back on?  At least from our experience, that appears to be happening.  Our preference is that the system does whatever it needs to do for W10 updates but then returns itself back to a "state" it was in before the updates.  How can we be sure that it does this?   We want our system to remain "ON" (all non ADMIN users will have logged off) when not in use in order to get and install updates but after they are installed, we need for the system to return to the same state it was in prior to the updates.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41757255
I missed the Home part. Nothing you can do for Home. It will update on its own. You cannot automatically go back to the before state and have to uninstall individual updates.

Windows 10 is NOT what you are used to and does not allow selective updates or no updates.
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by:tonyadam
ID: 41757346
John, we don't want to go back to the before state.  I gave you the wrong impression...my bad.  After the W10 is installed, we simply want the system to power back up by itself, ie, restart itself so that it returns to the desktop.   Example:
System is running an application
The application is closed by a non admin user
non admin user logs off and system displays the desktop
assume a W10 update has been automatically downloaded
the update gets installed some hours after the last user has logged off
the system then powers down and does not restart back to the desktop screen

 We want the updates to be installed but then we want the system to restart and return back to the desktop screen.   We're dealing with technically challenged users and anything much out of the ordinary, creates problems.   If the first non-admin user walks in to begin an application, he or she normally expects to see the Desktop screen but if the system is in a power off state, it creates problems.  An ideas on how we can solve this?
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41757689
The system should restart after updates (that happens for me). But it will not log back on to the Desktop as the user name and password is required.

non admin user logs off and system displays the desktop
...
the update gets installed some hours after the last user has logged off


This the way it works. Have you tried it? Is there an issue?
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by:tonyadam
ID: 41757981
Oops.  My bad....yes, I should have said that the system should power back up to the sign on screen.  

However, is there ever an update that gets installed and the system does not restart?  That is what we're seeing (system has powered down sometimes and then requires a power on and start up sequence) and it causes us to wonder if the updates were actually installed.  These users are not sophisticated enough to look at what updates have been installed or to check if there are other updates to be installed.  However, the ADMIN user can do this but is only on the system once or twice a week.  I realize that this sounds a bit crazy but we're trying to create a set of standards with the non-admin users.  If there are processes associated with the updates that do not follow a "normal" cycle,  then we want to be able to document what needs to happen to bring the system back to an operational state.   Hope this clears up the concern.
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John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 41758143
However, is there ever an update that gets installed and the system does not restart?    <-- I have had this happen, but it may depend on how well certified for Windows 10 your computer is.

Most but not all Windows 10 updates are now coming on Patch Tuesday which is monthly.

Based on what you are saying, it is safe to let automatic updates do their work, let the machines restart, and let the Admin service twice a month or more if needed.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 41760262
Thanks. and I was happy to help.
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