DNS analysis

I need to change the Name Servers for my public domain.
Is there a tool I can use to see ALL of the information that the current names servers have about my domain so I can copy them to the new name servers?

I do not have back end access to the old name servers

I do not know what all the spf, mx, A, Cname are etc.
I know I can manually look each individual one up on something like mxtoolbox but I want a report on ALL the settings in one shot.  I do not want to have to go searching for each record.
Thanks
ie0Asked:
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Jan SpringerCommented:
If you do not host your own DNS and cannot log into a portal to make changes, you need to ask your hosting provider for all of that information.

Unless your network was managed by your DNS hosting provider at one time, I would expect that someone within your organization asked for specific records to be configured.

Yes, you can manually look some of them up. But, the ones that you miss may be important.
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TechDeptCommented:
Start by doing a WHOIS. You can use GOOGLE

whois mydomain.com

If not hidden, this query will give you information about the owner, administrator, and technical contacts for your domain.

Since it is very unlikely that any DNS server will be configured to allow dumps (zone transfers) of the entire DNS zone database to any but authorized destinations, you can use NSLOOKUP or DIG to gather the information of the most common DNS records. But there's no way to know what, if any, DNS records you might be missing.

NOTE: If you are issuing these commands from within an Active Directory Domain that has the same name as the Internet Domain you are querying (i.e. Split-Brain DNS), then tack on a known external DNS server to each of the queries so that it will resolve the query for you instead of relying on your own DNS servers to do them. I would use Google's DNS server (8.8.8.8) as in the example below.

nslookup -q=soa mydomain.com.
nslookup -q=soa mydomain.com. 8.8.8.8

Start of Authorities.: Contains the email address of the responsible entity controlling your domain's DNS records. You can email this address and maybe arrange for a copy of the zone database.

nslookup -q=ns mydomain.com.

Name Servers: List of the authoritative DNS Name Servers.

nslookup -q=mx mydomain.com.

Mail eXchanger: List of the Servers, and their priority, that accept incoming emails for your domain.

nslookup -q=spf mydomain.com.
nslookup -q=txt mydomain.com.

Sender Policy Framework: Optional DNS records specifying trusted email sources for your domain and how to handle email from other sources.

nslookup -q=a www.mydomain.com.
nslookup -q=a mydomain.com.
nslookup -q=a *.mydomain.com.

1) Most common host record. Typically used as a web site pointer.
2) Optional "Default" IP when no host name is given. Typically points to the default web server.
3) Optional "Catch All" IP when an invalid host name (type-o) is given. Typically points to the default web server.

One last thing. From the WHOIS information, you will know where the domain is registered, such as Network Solutions, Go Daddy, 1&1, etc. You can contact them to take back control of your domain. You'll have to prove your identity, such as faxing your request on company letterhead from one of the company's known fax phone numbers.

Most likely, the DNS is hosted by the same entity where it is registered. If so, you'll have instant access to your DNS records. If not, you can transfer the DNS to a DNS hosting company of your own choosing and start building the zone database from the information you obtained above.

HTH
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