Solved

Adding items to a List in C#

Posted on 2016-08-23
6
56 Views
Last Modified: 2016-08-23
I am learning how to use Lists as part of C# generic collections. The code listed below is a simple class called Person with FirstName, LastName and Age as attributes for each employee in the Person Class.
After creating the class comes the List which is of type Person with an object called employees. Then I add two employees to the list.
All goes well except when I run the code I don't get the expected particulars of the second employee, instead I get "ConsoleApplication2.Person". I want to know what I am doing wrong.   Thanks.

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    class Person
    {

        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }


        public Person(string FirstName, string LastName, int Age)
        {
            this.FirstName = FirstName;
            this.LastName = LastName;
            this.Age = Age;
        }
   
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Person> employees = new List<Person>();
            employees.Add(new Person("Tom", "Drake", 50));
           employees.Add(new Person("Kelly", "Drake", 40));
            Console.WriteLine(employees[1]);
            Console.ReadKey();



        }
    }
}
0
Comment
Question by:Adam Trask
6 Comments
 
LVL 75

Assisted Solution

by:käµfm³d 👽
käµfm³d   👽 earned 200 total points
ID: 41767152
By default, Console.WriteLine will call the ToString method of an object that you pass to it. By default, objects--except for strings and ints (and such)--will print their type names. If you want to see the particulars, then you either have to dump out each property individually, or your have to override the default ToString implementation to dump out the values.
0
 
LVL 22

Expert Comment

by:p_davis
ID: 41767156
you are printing the object not the strings that make up the object.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Adam Trask
ID: 41767196
Thanks to both of you.  But I still don't know how to display the information on the console. Here is what I did:

class Person
    {

        public string FirstName { get; set; }
        public string LastName { get; set; }
        public int Age { get; set; }


        public Person(string FirstName, string LastName, int Age)
        {
            this.FirstName = FirstName;
            this.LastName = LastName;
            this.Age = Age;
        }
   
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Person> employees = new List<Person>();
            employees.Add(new Person("Tom", "Drake", 50));
           employees.Add(new Person("Kelly", "Drake", 40));
          //  Console.WriteLine(employees[1]);
          //  Console.ReadKey();

       }
        public override string ToString()
        {
            return "Person: " + FirstName + " " + LastName + " " + Age;
           
        }
    }
}
0
3 Use Cases for Connected Systems

Our Dev teams are like yours. They’re continually cranking out code for new features/bugs fixes, testing, deploying, testing some more, responding to production monitoring events and more. It’s complex. So, we thought you’d like to see what’s working for us.

 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
Kyle Abrahams earned 300 total points
ID: 41767255
add this to your class:


public string Output()
{
 return "Person: " + FirstName + " " + LastName + " " + Age;
}

Open in new window


then in your code:

  static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            List<Person> employees = new List<Person>();
            employees.Add(new Person("Tom", "Drake", 50));
           employees.Add(new Person("Kelly", "Drake", 40));
           Console.WriteLine(employees[1].Output());  //can also access any property, eg: employees[1].FirstName
           Console.ReadKey();
           

       }

Open in new window


Note that the main shouldn't be part of the person class.  You have a class which is responsible for itself.  Then you have a driver program which uses the class.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Adam Trask
ID: 41767350
Thank you Kyle
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Adam Trask
ID: 41767362
Thanks.  Things are getting a bit more clearer
0

Featured Post

Master Your Team's Linux and Cloud Stack!

The average business loses $13.5M per year to ineffective training (per 1,000 employees). Keep ahead of the competition and combine in-person quality with online cost and flexibility by training with Linux Academy.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

It was really hard time for me to get the understanding of Delegates in C#. I went through many websites and articles but I found them very clumsy. After going through those sites, I noted down the points in a easy way so here I am sharing that unde…
Performance in games development is paramount: every microsecond counts to be able to do everything in less than 33ms (aiming at 16ms). C# foreach statement is one of the worst performance killers, and here I explain why.
This is used to tweak the memory usage for your computer, it is used for servers more so than workstations but just be careful editing registry settings as it may cause irreversible results. I hold no responsibility for anything you do to the regist…
Established in 1997, Technology Architects has become one of the most reputable technology solutions companies in the country. TA have been providing businesses with cost effective state-of-the-art solutions and unparalleled service that is designed…

813 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

8 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now