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What are your guildelines for replacing network hardware?

a client reported complete loss of networking.  Going to the site, I see their 4+ year old Linksys SR2024 24 port unmanaged switch with no lights on. It is connected to an APC UPS that is on (another device connected to it has power).  I unplug the SR2024 from the UPS, connect it to another outlet on the UPS and it starts up.  I replug it in the first outlet and it powers up on that outlet also.

The UPS is 2 years old.  The SR2024 switch is version 3.  Anyone know if theres a production date in the serial number?  which is REM30HC03056

Amazon has reviews on the SR2024 from 2005 - 2009.

In general do you wait for a complete failure of a switch to replace it? Replace after x years?

Linksys doesn't have a lifetime warranty. For a Netgear or other product with a lifetime warranty, would your answers be different?

Thank you
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BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp
Asked:
BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp
6 Solutions
 
Bryant SchaperCommented:
In a small office I tend to replace when it fails, in larger enterprises we sort of do the same, but expect about a 7 year life, regardless of warranty.  HP offers lifetime on their switches, but technology can just outpace them at some point.  I have had 10 year old 3com and Cisco switches that still go strong, but have limited support from the vendors.
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Fred MarshallCommented:
I wait for a failure but not necessarily a complete failure.  e.g. Maybe a bad port would simply be bypassed / taken out of service.  But, if a device is "losing its mind" frequently then I'd replace it.
So, in that sense, reboots to fix things don't count unless they are required frequently.  At that, was the reboot unique to the one device or to many at once?  If many then there's not much information to go on.  So, I tend to keep track of failures and make decisions based on a device's history.
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BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelpAuthor Commented:
yeah, just that 1 device was off / no lights. unplugging and replugging it powered it up.  I'll know if they call again to start with that switch : )
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
With some exception, we find network gear lasts about 5 years. Juniper make really good stuff that can go longer and still do the job.

After 5 years, technology has moved and internal speeds (throughput) has increased, Wi-Fi has improved and so on.

So it is worth cataloguing what you have and listing the weakest things (consumer Linksys or Netgear) for earliest replacement.

UPS batteries should not be left more than 3 years.
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pgm554Commented:
Unless the technology has really changed over the years and makes sense ,I change infrequently.

I use Netgear and HP with lifetime warranties and first sign of problems I swap it.

Netgear is a no brainer and cross ships while HPE has become a pain in the @$$ and wants photos of the serial number and copy of your original receipt before they will ship.

I rarely use HP product anymore unless I inherit it.

If you're gonna replace ,go Netgear.
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nobusCommented:
normally  - modern electronics continue to work for a long time, unless they have bad capacators in it, or in it's power supply
you can look up on the net if your device is known for such

otherwise - just power it on; and if it does not happen anymore - don't worry
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IT-ExpertCommented:
Although it's likely that it's probably some kind of power fault with the switch, given what you describe, sounds like a bit of a strange fault.  
This may be a little far fetched, but how do you know that it's not a fault with the power outlet of the UPS that the switch is plugged into?  Of course, one possible way to tell, would be to either plug the switch into the other power port permanently, or do that AND plug something else into the 'faulty' port, to see if that 'something else' also powers down?

What you ultimately do, depends on the clients IT policy AND how much they take on-board your advice :)

What you might want to do, is (if possible), keep a known good spare switch handy, so if complete failure does occur  somewhere along the line, then you're not completely panicking, as you can use the emergency replacement to give you
time to order a new one?  (if you feel that's necessary)

If it was me?, I'd keep an eye on it, and see what happens.
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BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelpAuthor Commented:
thanks guys!
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