How configure for dedicated ip addresses

Can someone give me an overview of what I need to do re: configuration for a new isp account with multiple dedicated ip addresses in the following context:

I'll have an isp provided gateway.  Can I configure which of the dedicated ip addresses I wish to assign to the gateway?  Can I change it later by myself, or does the isp need to do this?

I'll have a router behind the gateway.  I want to assign one of the dedicated ip addresses to the router.  I'm unclear on where the configuration is that routes a packet over the internet to the gateway and then to the router?  I suspect the isp configures somewhere that packets for my dedicated ip addresses are routed to the gateway?
SAbboushiAsked:
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JustInCaseConnect With a Mentor Commented:
Typically you have two possible cases.
One is when your IP address assigned to interface is part of IP address range that is assigned to you, other case is when IP address on interface is not part of your IP address range.
Basically, you need to configure NAT pool and configure addresses from NAT pool for natting.
If you want to reserve some address for some host you need to do static natting to bind WAN address to internal IP address.

Configuration details, of course, are vendor specific.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
A reasonable ISP business plan where I am will provide 6 static IP and the bandwidth limit paid for. Do you need more than 6?
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
Nope
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farjadarshadCommented:
This expert suggested creating a Gigs project.
Could you please elaborate your question a bit. like your topology, router model etc
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Also, to get external static IP address (which is what you appear to mean in your question), you need to ask your ISP. When you ask them, what do they provide?
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
General question about concepts here.  I imagine the concept is the same regardless of ISP or router model / LAN topology?
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
It really depends on the ISP and what they offer. It is not so much a concept as it is a function of the offerings by an ISP.
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
I was going to comment with what Pradrag says, it really depends on how they are delivering the block, you need to check with the ISP.
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
Thanks Predrag - your post pointed me in the right direction: ip address range.  That made me realize I needed to brush up on subnet mask/network ID & related knowledge.

Scenario: I'm assigned a static ip range (using the address in link above as example) of 193.77.64.145-149 with
CIDR Block Number:  193.77.64.144/29
Gateway IP Address: 193.77.64.150
Subnet Mask IP Address: 255.255.255.248

My understanding is the following:
The ISP must assign a specific address for the gateway so it know how to route to it (i.e. I can't change it myself to one of my assigned static addresses)
193.77.64.144 is the Network ID (can't be assigned to a network device)
193.77.64.151 is the Broadcast ID
ISP would have a routing table that routes all packets for network .144 (i.e. .145 - .151) to the Gateway at .150
I would then need to use NAT to route .145-.149 traffic however I want

Is that correct?
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JustInCaseCommented:
The ISP must assign a specific address for the gateway so it know how to route to it (i.e. I can't change it myself to one of my assigned static addresses)
Yes, gateway (next-hop) should be ISP's router and sure ISP will not change it.
ISP would have a routing table that routes all packets for network .144 (i.e. .145 - .151) to the Gateway at .150
Not really. If 193.77.64.150 is gateway - that should typically mean that it is IP address of ISP's router. (your default route in that case should be - ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 193.77.64.150) All traffic for your IP address range will be forwarded to your router from ISP's router. You will configure one of those addresses on interface (e.g 193.77.64.145) and the rest of the addresses will be in the pool.
I would then need to use NAT to route .145-.149 traffic however I want
Yes.
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SAbboushiAuthor Commented:
Thanks Predrag - and also to all who posted.
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JustInCaseCommented:
You're welcome.
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