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O365: Get-Content | Get-MsolUser Information

I am looking to run a PowerShell command to export specific data from my Office 365 Tenant...

Referencing 'O365Users.txt' contains a list of UPNs.

Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | Get-MsolUser -ALL | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

Error:
Get-MsolUser : The input object cannot be bound to any parameters for the command either because the command does not take pipeline input or the input and its properties do not match any of the parameters that take pipeline input.

How could I pull this specific data? Thanks in advance.
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Christian Hans
Asked:
Christian Hans
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1 Solution
 
Vasil Michev (MVP)Commented:
Is it a CSV file? If so, try the following:

Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title } | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

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Christian HansAuthor Commented:
The file I am pulling from is a TXT file, so even when I create a CSV to pull from I get the following:

Get-MsolUser : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'UserPrincipalName' because it is null.
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oBdACommented:
Can't test it, but according to https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/azure/dn194133(v%3Dazure.98).aspx, the identifiers passed through the pipeline are only accepted by PropertyName.
So either pretend that your text file is a CSV by adding the header with the required property name:
Import-Csv C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt -Header UserPrincipalName | Get-MsolUser -ALL | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

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Or use a ForEach and pass the loop variable to the UserPrincipalName argument
Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | % {Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_ | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title} | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

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Christian HansAuthor Commented:
Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt Results:

Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title } | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

Get-MsolUser : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'UserPrincipalName' because it is null.
At line:1 char:98
+ ... ng\O365Users.txt | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Selec ...


------------------------------------------------------

Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.csv Results:

Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.csv | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title } | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

Get-MsolUser : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'UserPrincipalName' because it is null.
At line:1 char:98
+ ... ng\O365Users.csv | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Selec ...

------------------------------------------------------

Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt Results:

Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title } | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv

Get-MsolUser : Cannot bind argument to parameter 'UserPrincipalName' because it is null.
At line:1 char:99
+ ... ng\O365Users.txt | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN | Selec ...
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Vasil Michev (MVP)Commented:
Might be best if you simply give us example of the file :)
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oBdACommented:
1. Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt
Like with my first example above (https:#a41768991 which would be the easiest to use, actually), you can import a plain text file (without headers) as csv if you pass the header list to Import-Csv; in your example above, that would be "UPN".
Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt -Header UPN | % { Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN ...

2. Import-CSV C:\TEMP\O365Users.csv
If you're importing from a csv and working with the ForEach cmdlet,, the csv needs a header line, and you need to pass the loop variable with the column name you used as the header line. In your second example above, that would be 'UPN':
... -UserPrincipalName $_.UPN ...
The csv file would need to look like that:
UPN
john.doe@domain.com

3. Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt
If you're importing from a plain text file, and working with the ForEach cmdlet, you only need to pass the loop variable; the UPN property of a string will always be $Null:
... -UserPrincipalName $_ ...
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Christian HansAuthor Commented:
That worked flawlessly... thank you oBdA

Get-Content C:\TEMP\O365Users.txt | % {Get-MsolUser -UserPrincipalName $_ | Select UserPrincipalName,DisplayName,Title,UsageLocation,Office,Department,IsLicensed,SignInName | Sort Title} | Export-CSV C:\TEMP\Titles.csv
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