Windows 10 not recognizing new 4TB WD hard drive(GPT)

My son has a home built Desktop with ASUS P877-VLX Mobo that was upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10.  The computer has a 250 GB SSD for the C: Boot Drive and 2 mirrored 3TB drives for Data as well as another 3TB drive for data.  I configured a new 4TB WD Black drive on my own Windows 7 computer as GPT and copied all of his data off of the 3TB drive to it.  Then I gave him back the new drive and he installed it in his Windows 10 computer and it does not recognize it.  It sees the drive in the BIOS and it can see the drive in Disk Management but shows it as 2 partitions, one 2048 GB partition as GPT and another 1678 GB Unallocated partition.  Disk Management has all options grayed out and the only option it to take the drive offline.  Nothing shows up in Computer.  We downloaded and installed the Windows 10 Anniversary update hoping that it would solve the problem but still not working.

We have checked on line but have not been able to find anything to fix this?  Any help or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
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waytronAsked:
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waytronConnect With a Mentor Author Commented:
Well, I gave up on this and wiped the drive and just let Windows 7 reformat the 4TB driver as NTFS.  I gave it back to my son and his Windows 10 computer sees the full drive just fine now.  I checked Disk Manager and it does not offer the ability to convert it to GPT so we are just going to leave as is.

Thanks for all your comments and suggestions.  I am just so sick of messing with various Window 10 issues and then new issues after the Anniversary update, I just can't be bothered to work on this any more.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Does the computer have UEFI BIOS?  That may be why it is not recognized. Are you sure the ASUS BIOS can handle 4 TB. Can you get a BIOS update for the computer.
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rindiCommented:
Why don't you clear the disk again and create the GPT disk and partition it on the Windows 10 PC?
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waytronAuthor Commented:
I checked with ASUS and there are no Updates for the BIOS.
Disk Manager does not offer any options to reformat/erase or do anything with this disk other than online or offline?
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JohnConnect With a Mentor Business Consultant (Owner)Commented:
It is possible the very large disk is not compatible. Can you try what Rindi suggested (format it) in another PC ?
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rindiCommented:
Use the disk manufacturer's utility to first clear any data from it. Then use diskmanagement again.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPConnect With a Mentor OwnerCommented:
you have to use the 2nd option in your disk boot and not boot from the default mbr partition
on my machine ASUS I have to use the f8 to select the boot options and I will see the drive 2x
DVDROM and UEFI DVDROM  you have to manually select the 2nd option
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waytronAuthor Commented:
I originally formatted the drive in another Windows 7 computer and copied about 2.9TB of data to the drive before it was installed in my son's computer.  

I am not sure David's booting to 2nd option makes any sense but I will double check with my son to see if those options are even there.

I really starting to hate Windows 10. so many different problems on so many different machines and then the Anniversary update created a whole new set of problems.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Microsoft said in advance they were changing security and the main workings in this new update. It seems to have caught you with this, but it is working fine on the machines I have upgraded including domain and non-domain computers.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
From experience. if you do a mbr boot of the dvd you cannot install to a gpt drive, and vice-versa.
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nobusCommented:
check in the bios the sata settings - they can be on IDE - change them to AHCI
also, my Q can help :
https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/28964057/strange-bios-behaviour.html
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Is his OS 32 or 64bit? Connect the drive back to your PC, delete all partitions from it, convert it to MBR and then connect it to his PC. There you can try to convert the drive back to GPT and format it.
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waytronAuthor Commented:
64bit Windows 10
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noxchoConnect With a Mentor Global Support CoordinatorCommented:
With support of 32GB RAM the support of 4TB drive should be there no problem. Can you connect the drive back to your machine - delete all partitions from it and connect it back?
Also, when you right click on a 2048 GB partition from this drive - then select Properties - Hardware - select the WD drive - click Properties - Volume - populate. Is it shown as MBR or GPT? See my example.
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Gerald ConnollyConnect With a Mentor Commented:
So your son isnt trying to boot off this disk, you said he had a SSD that he boots off, but is just trying to add this 4TB disk as an additional disk?

If so, all the UEFI advice is a Red Herring, a GPT disk should be fine. There is some other mechanism at work here. I wonder if John Hurst's suggestion about the anniversary update to Win10 is the culprit?
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waytronAuthor Commented:
Yes the disk is not going to be a boot disk and for data only.  The problem was there both before and after installing the Windows 10 Anniversary update.

For some reason I cannot seem to do anything with the drive while it is in the WIndows 10 machine.  I tried WD utilities, Acronis Disk Director and Windows Disk Management, even though it shows up in the BIOS settings and in Disk Manager?  So I have asked my son to bring the drive back to me and I will look at it with the Windows 7 computer that I originally formatted the drive on.

I will keep you posted.
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noxchoGlobal Support CoordinatorCommented:
Yup, clean up the drive so that it has only unallocated space and then connect it back to Windows 10. See if you can format or convert it to GPT on Win 10.
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waytronAuthor Commented:
I never found a solution and gave up
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BugSheriffCommented:
Had same issue with Windows 10 on Dell Optiplex 990.

Wanted to add 2nd sata hard drive from my old system to transfer my files from old system to new system.

BIOS saw all the attached SATA drives.   Windows 10 only saw the original C drive and the DVD drive - not the drive I added.
Disc Manager did NOT see the drive at all.
Neither did Device Manager.

I tried different cables and ports - no dice.

I stumbled across a post on a Windows 8 forum from someone with the same problem who accidentally fixed his problem by running the Windows Memory Diagnostic.

If it worked for him, maybe it would work for me - so I ran the test.   After the system rebooted, all my drives where correctly listed and accessible with none of my files missing or damaged on my original drive.

I didn't have to reformat, or have to correct a drive letter conflict, or UEFI vs legacy BIOS, or Microsoft SATA controller drivers vs OEM drivers, or anything else that I shouldn't have had to do.

However, the point is, the drive should have been seen and accessible as soon as i booted after installing it - No ifs ands or buts - it should just work.    It did in Linux!!!

I'm not trying to jury-rig a Romulan cloaking device into my shield generator.

Why did Windows 10 and Windows 8 get so stupid?

Microsoft needs to get their act together, this is sub-par sloppy workmanship through and through.   And these are the same people that want to create self-driving cars and hold all of our personal information in their clouds.

I fight with Microsoft software every day at my job - did you know that Office 365/2016 can't be installed on the same system as a standalone office 2016 product?   Or the other way 'round?  I didn't either until I tried to install office 365/2016 onto a system that had standalone Project 2016 installed.   It can't be done, you have to pick one or the other.

Thank you Microsoft - Office 2016 is incompatible with Office 2016 - you guys are brilliant.

Heavy sarcasm implied.
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