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ToString() on Int or Double using current culture

Posted on 2016-08-27
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Last Modified: 2016-09-16
I'd like to be able to call ToString() on a variable without specifying a culture (so, using System.Globalization.CultureInfo.CurrentCulture in some way) that produces comma-separated integers for those of us in the U.S.:

123456789.123 => 123,456,789.123

but allows partners in Europe to see things according to their UI culture.  So, probably something like this:

123456789.123 => 123.456.789,123

Basically, with commas and decimals reversed.

I don't believe I should have to specify the target culture. I always want to use the UI culture.  Every damn example I can find seems to be targeting "de-DE" or something specific.  Or the result lacks the separator commas that I'm wanting for US-based users.

Thanks
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Question by:bamapie
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Expert Comment

by:Sandar Aye
ID: 41773459
Hello Bamapie,

Please take a look the following example code. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions.

            double value = 123456789.123;
            string specifier;

            CultureInfo culture;
            specifier = "G"; // Use standard numeric format specifiers.
            culture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en-US");
            Response.Write(value.ToString(specifier, culture)); // Result 123456789.123

            Response.Write("   ");

            culture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("de-DE");
            Response.Write(value.ToString(specifier, culture)); // Result 123456789,123


            Response.Write("<br>");


            specifier = "C"; // Use standard currency format specifiers.
            culture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("en-US");
            Response.Write(value.ToString(specifier, culture)); // Result $123,456,789.12

            Response.Write("&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;");

            culture = CultureInfo.CreateSpecificCulture("de-DE");
            Response.Write(value.ToString(specifier, culture)); // Result 123.456.789,12 €

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Gustav Brock earned 500 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41773627
All you should need is to specify the number of decimals:
double number = 123456789.123;
string formattedNumber = number.ToString ("n3");

// -> 123.456.789,123 in most of Europe.

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/gustav
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LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:Gustav Brock
ID: 41801197
The solution asked for should be culture neutral.

/gustav
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