Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 115
  • Last Modified:

How to tell if a power supply is compatible with my motherboard

Hi All Expert,

Good Day.

I have a friend pc who's unable to startup, and when he press on the power button, there is even no sound or power, thus I suspect is the power supply, therefore I have an idea of using other old pc power supply but how can tell if a power supply is compatible to motherboard? Or other hardware that will also cause pc to unbootable and without having any sound? Appreciate if any expert can advise me on.

Thanks!
0
xchiazyx
Asked:
xchiazyx
2 Solutions
 
Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
Easiest and safest way to check a power supply is with a power supply tester box.  If you don't have one, remove the supply or take the entire system to a local PC shop and ask them to test the supply.  Many locally owned shops will do this for free if you ask politely, but don't expect a major chain store (you know the one) to do it.

This prevents a possible unhappy result when connecting a probably-good power supply to a possibly-bad motherboard to test the supply.
0
 
rindiCommented:
First you need to check the mainboard's model and check about it's details on the manufacturer's website. It will tell you what are the minimum requirements for the PSU. Normally if it has the same connections available as your PSU it should work. But it may require a minimum number of Watts. If there is an add-on Video card, those often also need extra power connections directly from the Powersupply, and also they require a minimum of Watts. So you need to first make sure your replacement PSU can provide enough wattage for the system.

Many, particularly Small form factor PC's for example from Dell or HP use PSU's which you can't replace with another standard PSU, as they have different measurements and just won't fit into the case.
0
 
dbruntonCommented:
>>  Many, particularly Small form factor PC's for example from Dell or HP use PSU's which you can't replace with another standard PSU, as they have different measurements and just won't fit into the case.

It is not only the different measurements but they (sometimes) wire the plug connector differently to the standard ATX wiring scheme.

Now as for testing the older PC.  Disconnect all internal drives (hard disk, CDROM drive, floppy etc).  Disconnect all external devices (USB, parallel port, NIC etc).  Remove all addin cards (graphics (especially), NIC etc).  Try a reboot.  If it works then one of your devices is faulty.

If it doesn't then you can try the older PSU in the box (all items above still disconnected).  Assuming the wiring  schemes of the plugs are similar (note my comments in the paragraph above) then you can plug the PSU in and try it.  Note the older PSU should probably have about a 300 watt rating and be known to be working.
0
NEW Internet Security Report Now Available!

WatchGuard’s Threat Lab is a group of dedicated threat researchers committed to helping you stay ahead of the bad guys by providing in-depth analysis of the top security threats to your network.  Check out this quarters report on the threats that shook the industry in Q4 2017.

 
rindiCommented:
There might have been very few models a long time ago that had different wiring, but today's models have normal wiring. Besides that, those that dis have different wiring, also had different plugs which normal people can't connect to the mainboard without a great deal of force, which would break everything anyway.
0
 
CompProbSolvCommented:
@rindi:
I have run into a number of Dell computers that had standard-looking connectors but nonstandard wiring.  I've been unsuccessful at replacing them with standard power supplies.  Nothing damaged, they just don't work.

There are clear differences on the wire colors on those Dells vs. standard supplies.
0
 
nobusCommented:
0
 
Danny ChildIT ManagerCommented:
The other component that would tend to cause that kind of failure is the motherboard itself.  

It possibly could be the power switch too, but you can trace that cable back to the motherboard, unplug it to reveal the 2 pins, and then momentarily connect them with a small screwdriver to simulate a button press.  However, a bit unlikely.

You may also want to try a different mains cable or socket... ;-]

If you could post the make and model of the PC in question, that would help us narrow it down too.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Building an Effective Phishing Protection Program

Join Director of Product Management Todd OBoyle on April 26th as he covers the key elements of a phishing protection program. Whether you’re an old hat at phishing education or considering starting a program -- we'll discuss critical components that should be in any program.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now