Hyper-V Default Folder Location

Configuration FolderWhen I install Hyper-V on Windows 2012 R2 Server, it creates the following default folders.
Default location for virtual hard disk files: C:\Users\Public\Documents\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks
Default location for virtual machine configuration files: C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V

It seems to be that it makes more sense to put them in one root folder like the following:
C:\VM\VHD for Default location for virtual hard disk files and C:\VM\Configuration for virtual machine configuration files.

But I noticed that there are other folders under C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V.
So my question is if it is better to leave the default folder locations as they are or I can create my own folder like C:\VM and won't miss anything for not having all those additional folders (in C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V) seen on the screenshot.
sgleeAsked:
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Russ SuterConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can assign a new default folder without having any adverse effects on existing VMs. However the new default folder will only take effect for new VMs created after the change. You can move existing VMs but that can get a bit messy if you don't do it right.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPConnect With a Mentor OwnerCommented:
I always create a folder on another physical drive i.e. d:\hyper-v and move the contents of C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Hyper-V, I actually have the virtual disks on several hard drives (for performance reasons) until I win the lottery and can afford a 12TB PCI-E NVme SSD's)
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Philip ElderConnect With a Mentor Technical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
In PowerShell we always do the following:
Set-VMHost -VirtualHardDiskPath “X:\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks” -VirtualMachinePath “X:\Hyper-V\Volume1”
To check:
Get-VMHost | fl VirtualHardDiskPath,VirtualMachinePath

We always set up two logical disks on a standalone host's RAID controller.
75GB for the host OS
Balance GB/TB for guest settings and VHDX files. This second one is our X: drive.

We split things up to make it easier for us to recover the host if something goes sideways. A bootable USB flash drive with the host OS files on it is left plugged in to the host for this purpose.

I have an EE article that explains a bit more how we do things: Some Hyper-V Hardware and Software Best Practices.
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