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AD user account created date

Posted on 2016-09-01
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Last Modified: 2016-09-01
Does AD store a created date against user accounts at all? i.e. the date the account was created? And if so - can this be extracted via any of the AD cmdlets?
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Question by:pma111
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oBdA earned 250 total points
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Sure it does.
In ADUC, change the View to "Advanced View", then check the "Object" tab in the object's properties.
Or use the Attribute Editor and check the createTimeStamp and/or modifyTimeStamp attributes.
In Powershell:
Get-ADUser -Identity jdoe -Property createTimeStamp, modifyTimeStamp

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by:Benjamin Voglar
Benjamin Voglar earned 250 total points
ID: 41779589
Or Open cmd on DC as admin and run:


dsquery * domainroot -filter "(&(objectCategory=Person)(objectClass=User))" -attr sAMAccountName whenCreated -Limit 0
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