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How do I install an RPM package on my openSUSE Linux system?

I have an RPM file which I downloaded from the software publisher's website. I'd like to install the software on a virtual machine running openSUSE Leap version 42.1. I've tried using YaST2's Software Management GUI, as well as the RPM's command-line interface. Neither method has worked. When I use the GUI, I get the following error:

openSUSE-software-manager-error.png
It appears as though the software manager is looking for a list, and that the list is missing from the RPM package file.

I saw an article suggesting that if I right-click on the RPM file name in the folder view, the pop-up menu should include an option to install the file. There is no such option on the menu. Perhaps that's because I'm not logged in as root – although I don't know why that would matter because the system could simply prompt me for root's password.

When I use the command line, the RPM complains about missing dependencies:

rpm-command-results.png
I'm assuming that if I can use the GUI, the software manager will automatically install any missing dependencies. Alternatively, from the command line, I could specify the "nodeps" option. However, I'm not sure that would result in a viable executable.

In the past, I have succeeded at installing this software! Unfortunately, I don't recall the steps I took. So, I don't remember whether it was via the GUI or the command line.
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babyb00mer
Asked:
babyb00mer
1 Solution
 
John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
My SuSe systems are a bit old. Two things to check:

1. Make sure your Kernel is up-to-date. You can update this with YAST or another tool. You must restart the system upon installation.

2. No, RPM does not always install dependencies - you have to go back and do them.
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babyb00merAuthor Commented:
My SuSE system is very new. In fact, it was installed within the last 24 hours.

I was not suggesting that RPM will resolve and install dependencies. Use of the "nordeps" option ignores dependencies.

When I've used YaST2 in the past to install software, it will identify and install dependencies – when it can find them.

When I download the file, one of the options I'm given is to open it with Ark. perhaps I'll try that route to see where it takes me.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Yes, it should point you to where the dependencies are.
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rindiCommented:
Isn't teamviewer included in a repository for OpenSUSE? If not, make sure you have installed wine. Teamviewer needs that as one of it's dependencies, as it doesn't really exist as a native Linux package.
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babyb00merAuthor Commented:
I found the solution here. I had never heard of the zypper command.

I ran the zypper command to install each of the libraries listed in the author's example. Next, I ran the rpm command again (rpm --install teamviewer_11.0.57095.i686.rpm). Once again I got errors about failed dependencies. I don't know why I assumed that the missing dependencies in the authors example would be identical to mine!? Anyway, I ran the zypper command again, but this time I installed the 13 libraries previously identified as failed dependencies when I ran the rpm command on my system:

zypper install libSM.so.6
zypper install libXdamage.so.1
zypper install libXext.so.6
	.
	.
	.
zypper install libpng12.so.0

Open in new window


Finally, I ran the rpm command again:

rpm --install teamviewer_11.0.57095.i686.rpm

Open in new window


VOILÀ!

installation-success-1.png
Now the TeamViewer application appears in the Internet menu, and when I click it…

installation-success-2.png
As a footnote, I probably should mention that I ran the rpm and zypper commands from the superuser account.
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John HurstBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thanks for the update. I have run RPM from superuser but I never used or heard about zipper
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babyb00merAuthor Commented:
Although I answered my own question, I'd like to leave this thread in the knowledge base so that others might benefit
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serialbandCommented:
You should learn
zypper ps

They've ID'd services that needed restarts after patching for a few years now.  That's one of the nice things about SUSE as well as their default Xen setup in the installs.

zypper ps makes it more "complete" than apt-get or yum.  Debian does have a separate check-restart in debian-tools, but it's separate from apt.
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