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How do I install an RPM package on my openSUSE Linux system?

Posted on 2016-09-04
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Last Modified: 2016-09-10
I have an RPM file which I downloaded from the software publisher's website. I'd like to install the software on a virtual machine running openSUSE Leap version 42.1. I've tried using YaST2's Software Management GUI, as well as the RPM's command-line interface. Neither method has worked. When I use the GUI, I get the following error:

openSUSE-software-manager-error.png
It appears as though the software manager is looking for a list, and that the list is missing from the RPM package file.

I saw an article suggesting that if I right-click on the RPM file name in the folder view, the pop-up menu should include an option to install the file. There is no such option on the menu. Perhaps that's because I'm not logged in as root – although I don't know why that would matter because the system could simply prompt me for root's password.

When I use the command line, the RPM complains about missing dependencies:

rpm-command-results.png
I'm assuming that if I can use the GUI, the software manager will automatically install any missing dependencies. Alternatively, from the command line, I could specify the "nodeps" option. However, I'm not sure that would result in a viable executable.

In the past, I have succeeded at installing this software! Unfortunately, I don't recall the steps I took. So, I don't remember whether it was via the GUI or the command line.
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Question by:babyb00mer
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8 Comments
 
LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 41783908
My SuSe systems are a bit old. Two things to check:

1. Make sure your Kernel is up-to-date. You can update this with YAST or another tool. You must restart the system upon installation.

2. No, RPM does not always install dependencies - you have to go back and do them.
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Author Comment

by:babyb00mer
ID: 41783942
My SuSE system is very new. In fact, it was installed within the last 24 hours.

I was not suggesting that RPM will resolve and install dependencies. Use of the "nordeps" option ignores dependencies.

When I've used YaST2 in the past to install software, it will identify and install dependencies – when it can find them.

When I download the file, one of the options I'm given is to open it with Ark. perhaps I'll try that route to see where it takes me.
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 41783943
Yes, it should point you to where the dependencies are.
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LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 41783951
Isn't teamviewer included in a repository for OpenSUSE? If not, make sure you have installed wine. Teamviewer needs that as one of it's dependencies, as it doesn't really exist as a native Linux package.
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Accepted Solution

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babyb00mer earned 0 total points
ID: 41785035
I found the solution here. I had never heard of the zypper command.

I ran the zypper command to install each of the libraries listed in the author's example. Next, I ran the rpm command again (rpm --install teamviewer_11.0.57095.i686.rpm). Once again I got errors about failed dependencies. I don't know why I assumed that the missing dependencies in the authors example would be identical to mine!? Anyway, I ran the zypper command again, but this time I installed the 13 libraries previously identified as failed dependencies when I ran the rpm command on my system:

zypper install libSM.so.6
zypper install libXdamage.so.1
zypper install libXext.so.6
	.
	.
	.
zypper install libpng12.so.0

Open in new window


Finally, I ran the rpm command again:

rpm --install teamviewer_11.0.57095.i686.rpm

Open in new window


VOILÀ!

installation-success-1.png
Now the TeamViewer application appears in the Internet menu, and when I click it…

installation-success-2.png
As a footnote, I probably should mention that I ran the rpm and zypper commands from the superuser account.
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LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 41785049
Thanks for the update. I have run RPM from superuser but I never used or heard about zipper
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Author Closing Comment

by:babyb00mer
ID: 41792498
Although I answered my own question, I'd like to leave this thread in the knowledge base so that others might benefit
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Expert Comment

by:serialband
ID: 41792708
You should learn
zypper ps

They've ID'd services that needed restarts after patching for a few years now.  That's one of the nice things about SUSE as well as their default Xen setup in the installs.

zypper ps makes it more "complete" than apt-get or yum.  Debian does have a separate check-restart in debian-tools, but it's separate from apt.
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