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Exchange 2007 migration to Exchange 2013

Posted on 2016-09-06
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We have an old Exchange 2007 server that is running out of disk space, both on the C: partition and data partition, so much so that a service pack can not be installed to do a proper migration.  Is there a way to back up everyone's PST files, pretend that the EX 2007 server crashed, bring in the EX 2013 server, and then import everyone's PST files?  And does any site have a step by step process to follow this kind of set up?
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Question by:fletchman
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ScottCha earned 500 total points
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How to export mailboxes to PST with Exchange 2007

Friday, March 11, 2016
4:02 PM

Exchange 2007 Sp1 included a feature that allows mailboxes to be exported to .PST files. This is handy because users can natively open and interact with a PST file in Outlook.
We recently had a need to export 40 mailboxes to PST file and here is what it takes:
What you need
      • 32-Bit Exchange 2007 (SP1) admin tools.
      • Outlook 2007 or higher
      • Permission on the mailboxes
      • Additional storage to compensate for PST bloat (explained below)
      • Some powershell knowledge
      • Time (explained below)
 
Once you stand up a virtual machine running Outlook and have installed the 32-bit Exchange 2007 (SP1) tools, then you can proceed to the next step of granting yourself permission to the mailboxes that you need to export.
Add-MailboxPermission -Identity userYouWanttoExport -User YourAdminAccount -Accessright Fullaccess -InheritanceType all -Confirm
Then, before running the export command, it is advisable to calculate the size of the PST files that would be generated to insure that you have adequate disk space to accommodate. I found that the resulting PST file is 8.25 percent larger than the mailbox size. So if you have 40 mailboxes, multiply the total size by 8.25% to get the additional size beyond the total mailbox size needed to hold all of the data.
So for example, to get the size of a mailbox you can type:
Get-MailboxStatistics –id ‘John Doe’ | ft displayname, totalitemsize
DisplayName                             TotalItemSize
———–                             ————-
John Doe                          1584624412B
The size is in bytes, this would be a 1.5 GB mailbox. After adding the 8.25% for PST bloat, the resulting exported mailbox for John Doe would be 1.7GB.
Now you’re ready to run the export command by typing the following at an Exchange Management shell prompt:
export-mailbox –id ‘John Doe’ -PSTFolderPath z:\John.Doe.pst
To run this on multiple mailboxes, you can create a text file with a .ps1 extension and add the –confirm:$false command to the end of each line. This will allow the commands to execute in sequence without prompting for conformation. For example, scriptname.ps1 would contain multiple lines like this:
      export-mailbox -id usera -PSTFolderPath z:\usera.pst -Confirm:$false
      export-mailbox -id userb -PSTFolderPath z:\userb.pst -Confirm:$false
      export-mailbox -id userc -PSTFolderPath z:\userc.pst -Confirm:$false
      {etc}
You can then run the script by simply typing scriptname.ps1 at an Exchange Management shell  prompt.
The time it takes to export a mailbox to pst is dependent upon the size of the mailbox being exported, and the speed of the systems and disk subsystem.

From <http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/jstocker/archive/2010/01/27/how-to-export-mailboxes-to-pst-with-exchange-2007/>

I did something like this for a customer who buggered up an O365 migration.  I exported all of the mailboxes to .PSTs, copied them to the cloud then imported them into O365.

A suggestion....Why not go to Exchange 2016?  It is basically Exchange 2013 SP2.  You will have a newer product with a longer life.
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by:ScottCha
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I don't know what SP level you are at, but for this to work, you must be on SP1 for Exchange 2007.
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by:fletchman
ID: 41786584
Ok.  So, doing this will not cause any domain issues, as long as DNS is configured correctly?  Do you know of any articles that help with this?
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by:ScottCha
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If you aren't at at least SP1 you will have to find some way to free up space to install the SP.
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by:ScottCha
ID: 41786588
No, no domain issues.  But what you will want to do is once you have exported the mailboxes to PSTs, you will want to do an un-install  of Exchange 2007.  Be sure to export any certificates.  Also you will want to make a back up of your server.
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by:fletchman
ID: 41786589
The SP level is the issue, not SP 1.  I recently took over a network that the last IT just left them, and I'm left to clean up the mess.  I was hoping to just shut down the old EX 2007 (pretend it's dead), and just install the new EX 2013, if possible.
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by:ScottCha
ID: 41786597
You don't want to just shut it down because items will be left in AD.  These can cause issues down the road.  For example if/when you want to go to Exchange 2016, it won't install because Exchange 2007 pieces will be left behind.

If you're not at on at least SP1, you won't be able to export to PST from the server.  You'd have to do it manually by going to each machine.

I would not want to do it this way.  Something is sure to be missed.
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by:fletchman
ID: 41786604
Great feedback.  Thank you!  So it sounds like I need to find a way to get SP1 installed to go forward.
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by:ScottCha
ID: 41786615
Once you do have your .PSTs here is the import command.

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff607310(v=exchg.160).aspx

http://www.msexchange.org/articles-tutorials/exchange-server-2013/management-administration/managing-pst-import-export-process-exchange-server-2013-part1.html

Anytime.  Glad I can help.

Yes you do.

Some suggestions on getting some more space....add a drive, and move the log files, messaging queue to that drive.

See if there are some log files you can backup and delete.  If they are old enough, you won't need them, but back them up anyways.
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by:ScottCha
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You might as well install SP3.  It will make your system more stable.
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by:ArneLovius
ID: 41786697
fix the space issues first. I have done many offline backups of servers, to either a file share on another file server, or to a USB connected disk, then rebuilt with more disk space and restored the backup.

I would usually use clonezilla for an offline backup.

I would usually replace all of the disks in the server at the same time, so if there was an issue with the backup that was only discovered when restoring, it is possible to go back to the original disks without any data loss.
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