How do the JavaScript && !== operators work together?

function() {
return '{{visitor.id}}' && '{{visitor.id}}' !== 'undefined' ? '{{visitor.id}}' : undefined;
}

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Hi - I'm trying to debug some code and don't know JavaScript well enough to fully understand this piece of code. But from what I can gather, I believe this piece of code says (in laymens terms)
Return visitor.id if visitor.id is undefined

Is this correct? If not, could you help me understand what this is doing?
Elizabeth "Smalls" EckelsDigital Analytics ConsultantAsked:
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Julian HansenCommented:
&& is a boolean operator that returns true if both expressions left and right are true

!== is a strict comparison operator

0, false and null all evaluate to false but !== false checks specifically for the false value (0, null will not match)

return '{{visitor.id}}' && '{{visitor.id}} !== 'undefined'

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This looks like a template expression from Angular or similar. In a strict JavaScript sense '{{vistor.id}}' is just a string so will evaluate to true
I am guessing there is some compiling of that expression that is going on.

The expression is using a ternary operator (?) which is a short version of if (expr) then ... else...

Assuming that the {{visitor.id}} strings are being evaluated to the value of the id property of the visitor object then the return value is checking that
visitor.id is not a false value and it is not equal to undefined then return its value otherwise return undefined.

Seems like a waste of CPU cycles to me - a long winded way of saying return visitor.id but without seeing the context I cannot say.

To answer your question - no it will always return a value and from what I can see it will be whatever visitor.id is.
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Elizabeth "Smalls" EckelsDigital Analytics ConsultantAuthor Commented:
This was a very good explanation, thank you so much.

The context of the expression was to prevent an analytics system from overwriting a Visitor ID (such as ABC123) with "false" or "undefined" on web pages where it was false or undefined. The analytics system itself can't be configured to ignore undefined or false values, so that was the intent of this expression. I just didn't understand if, how or why it worked...but now I do. Thanks Julian!
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Julian HansenCommented:
You are welcome.
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