• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 38
  • Last Modified:

Prevent Old CA Certificate from being distributed to Domain Clients

Hi,

I run a Server 2012 R2 Domain.

I had an issue that my original CA certificate that expires in 2021 did not have the crl url in it so I created a new CA certificate created CA certificate that expires in 2026.

in the Certificate Authority General tab I can see both certificates.

I need to stop the original certificate from being distributed to the Domain Clients as its causing errors on my S4B servers.

I have tried going into the MMC certificates snap in (where you can see both the Old and New CA certificate) and deleting the old CA certificate on a client computer - but it just gets re-added.

any help would be appreciated

many thanks

jack
0
jackbenson
Asked:
jackbenson
  • 5
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
Okay... what I know.
There are two mechanisms thru which your trusted CA certificate is getting pushed to clients:
  1. Would be via Group Policy -- so you'd want to look thru the policies applied to your clients to make certain that isn't happening.
  2. Via certutil -dspubilsh.  In that case, I believe your certificate will be visible via ADSIEdit in Configuration,Services,Public Key Services, Certification Authorities.  Now, I fear -- that is the edge of my knowledge.  I suspect certutil -delstore is the best way to remove the old CA... but I don't know what impact manually deleting the CA Certificate might have.

In either case, fixing those will only prevent the client from receiving the CA on the local machine AGAIN after you remove them... it won't remove them.
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
Original request was to stop the certificate from propagating to the client machines.  There are two ways the root certificate would be distributed to clients, and this answer addresses each.
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
Adding additional information: This is the procedure to remove an Enterprise CA from an environment.  Steps 6 & 7 are of particular interest if your CA is being distributed from AD (rather than by group policy.)
0
Put Machine Learning to Work--Protect Your Clients

Machine learning means Smarter Cybersecurity™ Solutions.
As technology continues to advance, managing and analyzing massive data sets just can’t be accomplished by humans alone. It requires huge amounts of memory and storage, as well as the high-speed power of the cloud.

 
jackbensonAuthor Commented:
I do not need to remove the Certificate Authority

I originally created the  Certificate Authority in 2011 and it created a CA Certificate.

that original CA Certificate did not have a crl so I created a new CA Certificate in 2016.

every time I delete the old CA Certificate from a domain client - it gets replaced.

its not group policy that is causing it.

I need to stop the client computers getting the 2011 CA Certificate

thanks

jack
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
I believe I understand.  If the certificate isn't propagated by a Group policy, then there are objects in AD which still exist from the Certificate Authority created in 2011.  Because an Enterprise Certificate authority writes objects into the Active Directory, I believe you need to run thru the Certificate Authority decommissioning steps for that certificate authority.  I believe the specific object that needs to be removed is the certificationAuthority object specifies as the third object in step 6 -- but I'd advocate you run thru all of steps 5 and 6 to clean up the old installation.
0
 
jackbensonAuthor Commented:
Rich,

can I check that you understand that I have not installed a new Certificate Authority - just a new certificate for the authority created in 2011

thanks

jack
0
 
Rich WeisslerProfessional Troublemaker^h^h^h^h^hshooterCommented:
Apologies.  Just step six then... there are two certificateAuthority objects which contain the old certificate.  It's the object in "CN=Certification Authorities,CN=Public Key Services,CN=Services,CN=Configuration,DC=ForestRoot,DC=com. " which is causing that certificate to repopulate to your client machines... but be sure to only remove the 2011 certificate.

(And hopefully your new CA certificate isn't signed using the SHA1 algorithm.  Early next years, a fair amount of software will stop honoring certificates signed by CAs using SHA1.  Less of an issue for an internal CA, but could cause some software which checks to fail without a message.)
0

Featured Post

Prepare for your VMware VCP6-DCV exam.

Josh Coen and Jason Langer have prepared the latest edition of VCP study guide. Both authors have been working in the IT field for more than a decade, and both hold VMware certifications. This 163-page guide covers all 10 of the exam blueprint sections.

  • 5
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now