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Thick VM with thin SAN?

Posted on 2016-09-09
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Last Modified: 2016-10-14
Hello,

We are currently running a thin provisioned SAN back-end with a thick provisioned VM environment.  I'm trying to understand how this works / the logic behind it.  Is the SAN essentially saying "I'm going to give VM a logical block, but I will only account for what is used" and then the VM env is saying "oh I have this whole block of storage, I'm going to take it all"?

That is the scenario that I laid out in my mind, but I'm looking for confirmation as to what is actually happening here.

Thanks in advance!
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Question by:blinkme323
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Richardson Porto earned 1000 total points (awarded by participants)
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Since thick provision lazy zeroed only allocate the space but don't zero it out (like thick eager zeroed does), from SAN it will behave in the same way of a thin provision VM. But from VMware, you will have the space allocated and without risk of over provision the datastore space.

The following blog post explain with some additional examples: http://theithollow.com/2013/03/26/are-you-thin-or-thick-where-at/
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by:andyalder
andyalder earned 1000 total points (awarded by participants)
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As far as VMware is concerned it has all the space you gave it, but the SAN will only allocate physical disk space as and when needed. Create a few VMs with data on them and delete them again and you'll soon use up all the physical disk space in the SAN.

Whether the SAN grabs back zeroed out blocks is down to the SAN manufacturer, it probably does but it may only reclaim unused blocks periodically.
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by:Richardson Porto
ID: 41815135
Do you need any additional explanation or we can close the question?
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by:blinkme323
ID: 41836275
Yes, this can be closed.  Please award full points to each of the commenters as it will not allow me to.

Thanks
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by:Richardson Porto
ID: 41843327
Enough information provided.
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