Should I have one header?

I have a header for the index page, and a header for the rest of the pages. The reason I'm doing this is because the index pages are domain.com/index and the other domain names are domain.com/page/index.

This means in two places - both the menu and the external css/javascript the directory listing is different (i.e. css and ../css) - same thing in the menu.

So like I said I have a header for the index pages, and a header for the rest of the pages.

Is this desirable or should I code something else? Please describe how it should be coded if I should have something else.

Thanks
burnedfacelessAsked:
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Ray PaseurConnect With a Mentor Commented:
You can make all of your include paths relative to the document root.  That way, your CSS and JS directories can exist in one place and do not have to be proliferated across multiple directories.

Often home pages are simpler than detail pages, so your CSS cascade might include all the home page look-and-feel on every page (color schemes, etc), with more refinements to the CSS on the detail pages (layout).
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Olaf DoschkeConnect With a Mentor Software DeveloperCommented:
Look into URL rewriting. A url like domain.com/page can be rearranged into doimain.com/index.php?detail=page or similarly parameterized script.

This way any level of "folders" in the URL does not really address that folder structure, the sections /.../.../ just become parameters to a central controller, which then only needs one html header.

Side note: Even not going that way, you can avoid .. by using /css, / always going to the root, no matter where you are.

Back on the rewriting track, though, as it's a very good concept to structure urls seo friendly: You can write a simple webserver rule and handle all detail routing in a PHP script, that can act depending on $_REQUEST and/or $_SERVER['REQUEST_URI'] and just react with Location headers going to some controller script. Advantage of this is you can react to requests very individually.

mod_rewrite is the apache way of working with redirects and is based on regular expressions. It's advantage is fastest way to handle the redirection to whatever base controller script, disadvantage is this is all based on regex and hardly intuitive.

Both approaches have in common, that the uri structure is NOT reflected in a real folder structure, every request mainly goes through one or two scripts in webroot, perhaps in some other folder.

Perhaps take a look at the project folder structure of some CMS you just download and install to have a blueprint giving you the ideas you need, not only in this aspect.

Bye, Olaf.
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burnedfacelessAuthor Commented:
Thanks have something working now.
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