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Central management of Mac OSX machines

Posted on 2016-09-11
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Last Modified: 2016-10-16
We use MacBook Pro(around 50 nodes) to run our business. I'm trying to manage all the Mac machines centrally. Currently, I have a simple bash script to install all the applications/packages/dev-tools using brew on each machine.

I'm looking for opensource solution. Puppet can be an option but before that I want to make sure that I am not missing any opensource tool with nice web UI(like Casper suite).

How do you manage Mac OSX nodes from a central location to automatically setup the resources?
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Question by:Admin Senior
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strung earned 168 total points
ID: 41793516
Its not free, but Apple Remote Desktop sounds like what you want:

http://www.apple.com/remotedesktop/
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by:jessbruffett
ID: 41793672
I have to agree with Strung, ADR works very well for what your wanting. That plus OSX server with open directory, again not free, will allow you to do all this. Im not aware of any opensource solutions for your needs.
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by:Bing CISM / CISSP
Bing CISM / CISSP earned 166 total points
ID: 41793723
try munki, a set of open-source tools for OSX administrators to manage software installs on client OSX computers. it provides a central, webserver-based repository of packages and package metadata

FYI -

https://code.google.com/archive/munki

http://www.cultofmac.com/160154/thousands-of-macs-in-the-enterprise-how-the-big-companies-roll/
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by:Tim Lapin
ID: 41794402
We also use munki at our workplace.  Definitely give it a look.
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by:serialband
serialband earned 166 total points
ID: 41795009
If your script is already written in bash, can't you just enable Remote Login (SSH) and run it on your systems?  That's how I've always done it remotely from a centralized location.  You can even run a one-liner for each loop to install brew and then the dev tools.

I generally run those type of bash scripts from linux, since linux has fork and tentakel, and that makes for easier, compact, single line forked scripts.  Just output a log file to see which ones failed to complete.

It's bsd unix based and you can just as easily write those scripts.  When you have under a couple of hundred systems unix/linux scripts are easy enough.  Puppet, et al, are better if you have many, many more systems.  I think the free version only supports up to 10 systems, the last time I looked.
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