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Networking/NAT rules

I have a client that wants to set up a local dev server - and has obtained a block of 5 IP addresses from his ISP.

I'm pretty much a novice at networking stuff, although I have a somewhat basic grasp of the concepts.  So, before I go heading out there to finish configuring his stuff, do I have this right?

What I want to do is to pick an arbitrary external IP address, and create a NAT rule to map it to the internal network address of the server.  Is that correct?  So, like 216.225.x.x (external) has a NAT rule established to point it to 192.168.100.x (the internal address of the server).

?

If so, one side question.  In the documentation I see that they have "starting IP address" and "ending ip address".  So far as I know, the box only has one IP address assigned to it.  So would starting/ending be the same?

Thanks in advance!
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erzoolander
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erzoolander
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KimputerCommented:
Depending on the router, mostly you bind the external IP to an internal one first. After that you set the NAT rules. Most NAT rules are one on one, thereby making the beginning/ending IP useless (if no single input is allowed, fill in the IP number in both fields)
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erzoolanderAuthor Commented:
The router is a UTT AC750GW - and in the admin/nat rules there's a screen that looks like this.

I assume this is where you'd do that?

utt.jpg
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KimputerCommented:
Yes, this router takes away a bit of your control, by mapping external IP's sequentially to internal ones.
Right now, it's
202.1.1.131 - 192.168.16.200
202.1.1.132 - 192.168.16.201
202.1.1.133 - 192.168.16.202
202.1.1.134 - 192.168.16.203

Other routers gives you the freedom to choose the internal IP number at random.

What you showed was just the IP bindings. The NAT rules are in another menu.
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erzoolanderAuthor Commented:
Gracias!
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