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Word Macro to convert Simple HTML to formatting

Posted on 2016-09-13
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Last Modified: 2016-09-26
I have a document that was imported from HTML, so it has the HTML tags, such as <em>, <I>, <p>, <b>, &nbsp;, etc.
I want to convert all these tags to the appropriate formatting.
Is there a way to do that with a macro? Does one already exist?
Thank you.
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Question by:Lev Seltzer
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Assisted Solution

by:GrahamSkan
GrahamSkan earned 250 total points
ID: 41796494
Word can open HTML files, thought the presentation might not be the same as a browser, so the usual way to convert would be to open the file and to save it as a .docx file.

If this doesn't work satisfactorily, please post a sample file here.
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Accepted Solution

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Paul Sauvé earned 250 total points
ID: 41796574
GrahamSkan is correct...

In my experience, after opening the file in Word, I do is change the view from Web Layout to Print Layout

I find that I have had to remove parts of the html file (superfluous tags, etc) and do a bit of editing in order to get better results.
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Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 41796843
See the attached for an example.
The HTML starts in the data file and gets merged into a standard word document.
I want to remove the HTML tags.
example.docx
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Author Closing Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 41815557
I hired a programmer to write the macro for me.
Thank you.
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