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Veeam, Storagecraft, and Windows System Image

Hi, I have Windows 8.1 and 10 troubleshooting and recovery more difficult than Windows 7.  There are recovery solutions such as Veeam and Storagecraft but I was wonder how effective is Windows System Image?  Does anyone use it?  Is the only problem with Windows System Image the lack of incremental backups?  Is it sufficient if you only concerned about a quick restore and critical data for the workstation is stored somewhere else?
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snoopaloop
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snoopaloop
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IvanSystem EngineerCommented:
Hi,

as I know, Windows System Image will require you to restore it to a same computer, while Storagecraft and Veeam can restore image to new hardware/ computer.

You are correct regarding backup types, and both Storagecraft and Veeam have incremental options, which is important for me.
I am personally using Veeam Endpoint backup, since it is free (even for business use), easy to install and use, it has required backup/ schedule, etc options that I need, and works very well, at least for file level restore. Didn't have a need to do a image level restore, but it has that option as well.

As for Storagecraft, I have a license, but didn't have time to test it. As I hear it is good as well, but not a free solution.

Regards,
Ivan.
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snoopaloopAuthor Commented:
so the business will not pay for third party software.  Is best practice at this point to use the internal system image software and store it on the C since most Windows 8.1 and 10 failures are due to a simple boot failure?  The rest of the drives always seem to be fine except for some rare instances where they fail.  In that case, I would need to start from scratch because the hardware (new laptop/desktop) replacement would most likely be different and therefore the image would be useless.
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IvanSystem EngineerCommented:
Hi,

as said, Veeam Endpoint Backup is free. I would recommend that you try it, since it can restore image to new hardware.

You can also create full backup of computer with it, and then schedule to do incremental, and store all of that onto some storage, or computer with a lot of HDD space. That way even if computer faill, data will be secured on another place, and you can restore it.
If user is not connected to LAN, then backup will be skiped, and will continue as soon as he can connect to storage. Either way, data lost can be reduced, and will be much less then not having any backup.

I am doing daily incremental, an storing on NAS, so I don't really worry if something goes wrong :)

Regards,
Ivan.
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snoopaloopAuthor Commented:
Gotcha, can you only use Veeam boot media to recover from a disaster?    Also, some people are saying they use it for MS Server.  Can this be done?
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IvanSystem EngineerCommented:
Hi,

if you want to do a full restore of entire computer to a new computer/ old computer, then you need to create boot media. There is an option to create it, directly from Veeam.

On the other hand, if you need just some data from that backup, then you can always take that backup and put it on machine where you have veeam installed, and pull out all required data..
Veeam is going to mount that data in C:\VeeamFLR, and you can simple copy/paste it, or use Veeam to restore it. What ever you like.

It is supported on Windows server 2008R2 / 2012/ 2012R2. I still haven't use it on it, since my servers are VMs, and i'm using another product for that. I am using this product for my workstations.

Regards,
Ivan.
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snoopaloopAuthor Commented:
Very thorough and interesting answers.  Thank you Ivan.
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