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Windows Server Requirements

Posted on 2016-09-19
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Last Modified: 2016-11-22
Hello Experts, can I purchase a decent desktop system and run windows server for a DC?   I don't need a lot of power and currently the DC is running on a Win 2003 Standard edition.  I want to cut cost but also put in SSD Drives to get performance.  Any downsides to this?  I would purchasing Dell products.

The current system provides DC, print services and that is about it.

I would want to install Win 2012r2
The hardware I am thinking about is i3, 8gb to 16GB  RAM, 250 GB SSD...

Thanks
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Question by:tucktech
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Cliff Galiher earned 500 total points
ID: 41804770
Most desktop systems use hardware that don't have server drivers. They are also not built for server workloads. Any gains you get from an SSD would be lost in other areas.

Buy a server.

There are entry level servers on the market that can let you cut costs and yet still have a quality system designed to purpose. There is no justifiable reason to buy a desktop.
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Author Closing Comment

by:tucktech
ID: 41804785
Ok, trying to do otherwise may be trying to put the round peg in a square hole.  To fight it will just make bigger issues.  Thanks for the feedback.
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by:Akhater
ID: 41804787
The problem with the desktops is typically not the power but the hardware components

No redundant power supply, disks that are not hot swap and chips that are not really built to operate 24/7, cooling system etc...

This said you can very easily run a desktop as a server (most small companies here do) as long as you understand the risks and you are comfortable with it
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by:Rich Weissler
ID: 41804795
To add emphasis to Cliff Galiher's comment... especially if you're considering adding an SSD to the system.  Desktop SSD and a Server (Enterprise) SSD are different critters.  If you have to decide between a desktop with an SSD drive, vs an entry level server... even if it needs to not include an SSD, consider the type of workload to which you'll be subjecting the system, how long you anticipate needing the server to function, and the cost of downtime.  (The downside to a desktop PC with a consumer grade SSD running 24/7 would be a shortened lifespan.)
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Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 41804796
Your server(s) run your business.  These are not the systems to be cheap with.  It's very unwise.
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