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Trying to find a source of the Invalid Login attempts

Posted on 2016-09-19
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Last Modified: 2016-10-22
I have a server windows 2k8 that has port 3389 open for the persons that need RDP to run an application while away from the office.
I have all logging for successful and failed logins going on.
I am getting thousands of failed logins within a 24hr period.

Here is the problem these thousands of logins that are failing are showing up in the event logs as an error 4625 but within the log entry there is only a "-" where a source ip address should be and a "-" where a source port should be.

I can try to login to the server using "bad credentials" and the source ip address and port show up for this type of  failed login.

example of event log below.
An account failed to log on.

Subject:
      Security ID:            NULL SID
      Account Name:            -
      Account Domain:            -
      Logon ID:            0x0

Logon Type:                  3

Account For Which Logon Failed:
      Security ID:            NULL SID
      Account Name:            jose
      Account Domain:            

Failure Information:
      Failure Reason:            Unknown user name or bad password.
      Status:                  0xc000006d
      Sub Status:            0xc0000064

Process Information:
      Caller Process ID:      0x0
      Caller Process Name:      -

Network Information:
      Workstation Name:      
      Source Network Address:      -
      Source Port:            -

Detailed Authentication Information:
      Logon Process:            NtLmSsp
      Authentication Package:      NTLM
      Transited Services:      -
      Package Name (NTLM only):      -
      Key Length:            0

This event is generated when a logon request fails. It is generated on the computer where access was attempted.

The Subject fields indicate the account on the local system which requested the logon. This is most commonly a service such as the Server service, or a local process such as Winlogon.exe or Services.exe.

The Logon Type field indicates the kind of logon that was requested. The most common types are 2 (interactive) and 3 (network).

The Process Information fields indicate which account and process on the system requested the logon.

The Network Information fields indicate where a remote logon request originated. Workstation name is not always available and may be left blank in some cases.

The authentication information fields provide detailed information about this specific logon request.
      - Transited services indicate which intermediate services have participated in this logon request.
      - Package name indicates which sub-protocol was used among the NTLM protocols.
      - Key length indicates the length of the generated session key. This will be 0 if no session key was requested.

Please advise why this may not be showing the source ip address and port.
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Question by:Dan Pope
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10 Comments
 
LVL 16

Assisted Solution

by:John Tsioumpris
John Tsioumpris earned 125 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41805239
Have you tried Netwrix Account Lockout Examiner
It will give you a starting point....
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dan Pope
ID: 41805491
Sorry Netwrix does not give me the information that I need.
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LVL 39

Accepted Solution

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Aaron Tomosky earned 250 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41814218
Yup, with the newer SSL rdp security you don't get ip addresses in the rds logs, super annoying.

Here is some good advice from a similar question:
1. Change your rdp port
2. If you lower security to force the old method you get ip addresses in the rdp logs
https://www.experts-exchange.com/questions/27780653/RDP-brute-force-attempts.html

There is a way to live corollate failed attempts with an IP address by looking up a different event id but it's hard after the fact to corollate them.
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LVL 23

Assisted Solution

by:Brian B
Brian B earned 125 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41814317
I would really recommend finding some way to do this besides leaving port 3389 open. Perhaps LogMeIn or Team Viewer or an app that manages the connection for you? Otherwise, publish the remote desktop on a different port on your firewall and then forward that port to 3389 on your server.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:huacat
ID: 41823245
Try to check event logs from eventviewer, expand the node to
Applications & Services log -> Microsoft -> Windows -> TerminalServices-RemoteConnectionManager -> Operational

Try to check if it log the IP address for failed login activity.
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
ID: 41823418
Hi Dan. Can you please let us know how this is going? I see you have been logging in, so some feedback to indicate if any of the advice our volunteer experts have given is useful.

One of the bigger concerns is to see if someone is trying to hack into your system from outside. Check your firewall logs for traffic going to this server.

I have also added some topics to your question that are more related to the problem. I also removed windows XP since it is not relevant. Hopefully this will bring the question to the attention of more experts.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Dan Pope
ID: 41823706
To brian
thank you this issue and you'als remarks have been move up the executive chain. Since fixing this issue seems to be a process shift from the way things were been done.
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LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:Brian B
ID: 41826511
Thanks for the update. If you consider this question to be solved, please don't forget to accept the answers that helped you.
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LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
ID: 41855059
Good attempts at finding the IP address, and more importantly good suggestions for stopping future attacks or at least being able to log them.
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