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how to change FQDN or other options to fix SSL certificate

I've been notified by Godaddy that I need to change our SSL certificate from a common name to a FQDN before Sep 28.  Right now my SSL is for uxxxxx.net and my FQDN is uxxxxx.int.  

My functional level for the domain is 2008 R2.  I'm not the best with this kind of change and am uncertain what to do.  Do I have any options other than renaming my FQDN?  If not, how do I rename it?  What else needs to be done?  Will that change automatically filter to all the other servers?    I had been told by a vendor previously that this is a difficult change to make so I'm basing my hesitation on that conversation.  If it has to be done, I want to make sure I cover all my bases before doing it.
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cindyfiller
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cindyfiller
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3 Solutions
 
Todd NelsonSystems EngineerCommented:
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Schnell SolutionsSystems Infrastructure EngineerCommented:
You do not need to change your internal FQDN domain name. But you need to remove from the digital certificate any name that corresponds to a domain that is not valid externally and registered for your company. For example, if your certificate includes a name ending with .local, .int, even if it is as a secondary name, then you will need to renew your certificate without using that name.

The point is that this process will involve as well an analysis of the applications where you are using the digital certificate, because if they have any function working with the internal name you will need to figure out a solution to avoid using the internal name and associate it to the certificate. Some solutions in this scenario could be:
- Create an split DNS configuration, and you will point your internal application using the external name and in this way it will work with the new certificate.
- Divide the certificates used by your application. The external functions are going to be handled by the new certificate that does not include internal names, and the internal functions that require the internal name you can configure then with an internal digital certificate in your network.

However, these solutions involve more environmental configuration and a clear knowledge of how your applications are using the certificate and what kind of clients are consuming it.
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cindyfillerAuthor Commented:
This sounds more complicated than I can handle, based on your comments...  I'm not sure if I need a certificate internally for anything...  and the only thing I use the external SSL for is our webmail.  I don't suppose it is as easy as dropping the .net off the certificate?  I'm leaning more towards hiring someone to do this but want to do a bit more research first.
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Todd NelsonSystems EngineerCommented:
You can certainly create a new cert request and not include the internal FQDN names (i.e. .local, .int, .ad, etc.)

However, if the Exchange internal URLs are set with .int (or any other non-routable FQDN) you will need to update those URLs to something that is in your certificate.
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Schnell SolutionsSystems Infrastructure EngineerCommented:
If you are using the digital certificate for Exchange it makes it more clear. And in that case the solution is to follow the path specified by Todd.
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cindyfillerAuthor Commented:
Someone else at Godaddy sent me instructions they have for accomplishing what I need to do.  It seems like it is much less severe than what I originally thought.  Can you look at this article and see if it straight forward or do I need to additional steps as outline above?  The vendor I wanted to contract with still hasn't replied to me so it is looking more like I may have to do this.  

https://www.godaddy.com/help/reconfiguring-microsoft-exchange-server-to-use-a-fully-qualified-domain-name-6281?v=1
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Todd NelsonSystems EngineerCommented:
What GoDaddy provided you is more or less what is documented in the links I provided.  It's not difficult.

Digicert has a tool to do it--and reverse the settings if needed ... https://www.digicert.com/internal-domain-name-tool.htm
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cindyfillerAuthor Commented:
It turns out my issue was much easier than I thought.  The problem was that I had some alternate names on the SSL that weren't allowed.  My certificate was ready to expire, so once it was rekeyed, everything was fine.
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