What is the meaning of mount pont? with respect to windows file server.

What is the meaning of mount pont? with respect to windows file server.
satheesh kumarAsked:
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Peter HutchisonConnect With a Mentor Senior Network Systems SpecialistCommented:
Normally volumes are assigned drive letters, you what you can do is assign folder rather than a drive letter to a drive. For example you have a 1GB called C:, and you have a second disk. So, instead of assigning a drive letter, you can assign a folder and mount that to a drive - this is a mount point. For example the folder you created is called Data which is on C: but instead points to 2nd drive.

To create mount points you can use Disk Management, and on a New Volume you Assign a mount point instead of a drive letter.
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rindiConnect With a Mentor Commented:
If you want to access a Windows share on a Linux PC, you must first create a mount point, similar to when you mount local partitions. Then you can mount your Windows share to that mount point. After that you can access the share on the linux box directly by navigating to that mount point, for example via /mnt/ServerMountPoint.
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arnoldCommented:
Unix/Linux uses a higherarchy/tree type Layout starting with the root/top of the tree as /

 every partition can be set to be accessible from a different reference.

As others pointed out, partitions are commonly accessed by drive letters. The driver letters are equivalent to mount points.
A more direct representation as Peter and rindi pointed/.
Lets say you want your system to only have one drive letter c:
but the space for the partition where C: exists is small.
So you add another/a few drives.
You partition each additional drive. to maintain single drive reference, instead of assigning a drive letter to each partition within diskmanagement interface, you assign each additional partition a parh
drive 2 partition1 will be accessible as c:\newdrive2_1
drive 2 partition2 will be accessib;e as c:\newdrive2_2

though usually it could be
OS/boot drive 1, c:
drive 2 partition1 c:\users
drive2 partition 2 c:\programdata
dirve 3 partition1 c:\program files
drive 3 partition 2 c:\program files (x86
drive 4 e:\

the references are "mount" points
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
Traditionally on Windows a mount point would be seen as as an additional drive,say a D: drive (or anything between D & Z) but a mount point can also be a folder, so that a folder name in "Documents" could be in C: or it could be on D: (or Z: or ... )
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rindiCommented:
satheesh-kumar,

Is there something you still haven't understood? Then please come back and follow up. If not, then please come back and close the Question.
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satheesh kumarAuthor Commented:
Thanks Rindi,

I am closing this question.
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satheesh kumarAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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