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Network Domain Name - To long, need an alternate

Posted on 2016-09-26
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Last Modified: 2016-10-24
I need to change a Server with a long name XXXXX.XXXXXXX (that's the length of the current Network Domain Name)

Can I create an Alternate Domain Name, that is shorter and still keep both?  Do I need to?  

I do not want to have to recreate desktops.  I only have the one server.

I feel like this might be a really stupid question, not even sure if I am asking it right.

The current environment is Server 2012 Win7 Pro Workstations, no VM's
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Question by:Eric_Where_am_I
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by:Maclean
ID: 41816812
Is this for a business?
If for a business and not sure what to do with the domain, I would not touch anything and get some expert assistance to evaluate how things are configured, for expert advise.

This is something that is hard to do via a forum online without plenty of detail.
Why do you need to change the servers name? If you just need an alias to reach it on, you can setup an A record on DNS (IF DNS Server role is deployed and configured on the server)

Or is it the actual domain name you wish to change?
Perhaps you want to add a child domain?

Would need some more information :)
But again, if this is a business domain, and you are not sure on what you are doing, I would be hesitant to make any recommendations which might lead to the domain being at risk of failure.
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by:Muhammad Mulla
ID: 41817591
I'm not sure I understand your question fully.

Do you want to create an alternate DNS entry for a specific machine?
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by:Eric_Where_am_I
ID: 41818239
Sorry about not asking this correctly.

Here is my problem, our current NETWORK domain name is to long for a feature that a vendor would like to provide.  I feel I have two choices.

Rename the Network Domain - easily enough I guess, just never had any luck with that, end up with having to recreate desktops.  There are only about 17-18 machines so its probably the best plan.

The other option I was hoping for, can I create an "alias" name that is shorter and still points to the original network domain.  

This is not an internet question, all of the traffic is internal.
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by:Maclean
Maclean earned 250 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41818553
I would be tempted to use an alias. Ask the vendor if adding an A record to the DNS and providing him that as FQDN would suffice. It saves work and potential hassles. Vendors should be aware that their clients are not going to re-configure their domain to buy or use a product in many cases. So they should be aware of such workarounds.
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footech earned 250 total points (awarded by participants)
ID: 41831016
There's no such thing as an alias for a domain.  A domain has both a DNS name, and a NetBIOS name.  The first part of the DNS name, and the NetBIOS name should generally be the same - variations generally just cause confusion with no benefit.  So if the DNS name for the domain is "corp.example.com", the NetBIOS name would be "corp".

There is such a thing as an alias DNS record (CNAME) which allows you to use a different name to reach a specific host.  For example if the FQDN for the host was "server95485890.corp.example.com" (assume there is an accompanying A record), you could create a CNAME record named "app.corp.example.com" to point to the previously mentioned A record, which would then resolve to the correct IP.

If the feature this vendor wants to implement is really dependent on the DNS name of the domain, then I'd say they're a crap company if they don't support everything that is acceptable by MS as an AD domain.
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by:Muhammad Mulla
ID: 41856700
Most informative comments on the question
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