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AIX minage & maxage & rlogin  in default & indiv ids

Posted on 2016-09-27
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Last Modified: 2016-11-01
In /etc/security/user,  we have
default:
      admin = false
      login = true
      su = false
      daemon = true
      rlogin = true
        . . .
      minage = 1
      maxage = 8
      mindiff = 3
      maxrepeats = 2
      dictionlist =
      pwdchecks =

oracle:
      minage = 0
      maxage = 0

infrauser1:
      minage = 0
      maxage = 0

sshuser:
      admin = false
      maxage = 0

infrauser2:
      minage = 0
      maxage = 0


Q1:
For infrauser1 & 2, shouldn't the minage=1 & maxage=8 to match with the default & security best practice?

Q2:
with min & maxage=0, for these 2 infra users, do these settings override the system default's minage=1 & maxage=8 ?

Q3:
For oracle account, what's the best/secure practice out there?  min & maxage=0 ?

Q4:
for sshuser used to do sftp, what's the best/secure practice out there?  min & maxage=0 ?
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Question by:sunhux
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tfewster earned 500 total points (awarded by participants)
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Q1: Yes, it should match your security policy (I assume the defaults reflect that policy)
Q2: Yes, it should match your security policy
Q3: It should match your security policy
Q4: It should match your security policy

I know this is a simplistic view, but it's best security practice. If it's merely inconvenient for the DBAs to change the oracle password, that's not a good enough reason - You can do a great deal of damage with the oracle ID, so it has to be properly managed. Even better, make the DBAs log in with individual IDs and give those IDs sudo rights to switch to the oracle id.

If the other accounts are configured in multiple endpoints, e.g. scripts, that can make it harder to manage.  But you need to know the procedure to change those passwords (including updating any login scripts). Then you can start to enforce regular rotation at a convenient time of day BEFORE the password actually expires.

Also consider using ssh keys instead of passwords, to you can keep better control of access without having to distribute passwords.

Of course, it also depends on how sensitive these accounts are. If the sftp user can't  do much apart from get/put non-sensitive files, you can grant an exception in that case - e.g. change the password less often (but still keep track of who/where it is used)
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by:sunhux
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Need to clarify on what's "Yes" esp for the following 2 :

Q2:
 with min & maxage=0, for these 2 infra users, do these settings override the system default's minage=1 & maxage=8 ?
 So in the case of our infrauser1 & 2, our setting of 0 is not adhering to best practice?

 Q3:
 For oracle account, what's the best/secure practice out there?  min & maxage=0 ?
 So it should be 1 & 7 respectively according to our security policy?
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by:sunhux
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Miss 1 item which was in the subject of the 1st posting:

In the same /etc/security/user,
default:          
                rlogin = true  

Shouldn't rlogin be set to  'false' as rlogin doesn't require password & keys ?
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by:tfewster
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Apologies, I missed some of the points
Q2: Yes, individual settings override the system default, so these accounts are not compliant with your standard policy (I assume the defaults section settings match company policy, I'm pretty sure they've been tweaked from the settings on a fresh system install)

Q3: Yes, 1 and 8 (or just remove the "overrides") to match company policy. If you plan to change the password every 7 weeks, it will never expire. Even it does expire, cron jobs etc. will continue to run - only the login will be disabled.

The rlogin setting refers to remote login capability with rlogin/rsh/rexec AND telnet, so if you don't use those protocols any more then set rlogin=false. ssh/sftp and standard ftp will not be affected.
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by:tfewster
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Hi sunhux - I'm happy to discuss this further if you want to.

EE prompted me to close the question and award myself points which seems a bit unethical - If you want it deleted, I have no objections!

Regards,
tfewster
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