VOIP grade small switch

We have a small 5 port GB switch between our LAN and phone system. My phone tech did some troubleshooting on an issue we were having the other day, when I asked him if he can see anything else that I should be concern with he told me the small 5 port switch was not VOIP grade and that I should replace it. I asked him for a recommendation his response is to replace it with a Netgear GS 108T.
Any suggestions are appreciated
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAsked:
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pgm554Commented:
Netgear makes good qualty stuff ,but what's the rest of the infrastructure look like in terms of networking gear?
Do you need POE?
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Dr. KlahnPrincipal Software EngineerCommented:
imo, if the switch can handle the incoming bandwidth of your network's front-end modem and your wiring plant, then it's satisfactory.

VOIP does not use much bandwidth.  Cisco's bandwidth calculations for VOIP connections generally are between 30 kbps and 60 kbps.  10 simultaneous phone calls would then use a maximum of 600 Kbps, which will not tax the performance of any switch.
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aleghartCommented:
As long as the uplink ports are not saturated, the VoIP calls will not have issues.  This is LAN.  There's no way 5 phones could even saturate a 100Mbps port.

That's assuming the switch is actually a switch (not a  hub), and that's it's wire-speed.  In older switches, we had to look at backplane bandwith and pps (packets per second) forwarding speed.  Often, the switch could not keep up with multiple 100Mbps saturated ports.  Or sometimes, couldn't manage more than 200-300Mbps on a gigabit port.

If this is a new switch, it really shouldn't be that much of a problem.

Do you have multiple switches cascaded?  Or just a single 5-port switch for the entire LAN?
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jsarinanaI.T. ManagerAuthor Commented:
thanks
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