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How to run something on Hyper-V?

I am testing Hyper-V.

Say I close the consoles; how do I run something on server? I can log off and on, but that's not the point. Win+R doesn't work. - Is there a trick or something? How to run something from blank screen?
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mrmut
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mrmut
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1 Solution
 
CompProbSolvCommented:
I don't think your question is clear.

If you set up applications to auto-start with the Windows VM then all you have to do is start the VM and the applications will run.  You can use VNC or Remote Desktop to access the VM and initiate programs from there.  You can start the Hyper-V manager, connect to the VM, and then run applications from there.

The "blank screen" is a concern.  When are you seeing that?  Is it truly blank with no icons or anything?  You should be seeing a standard desktop.
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mrmutAuthor Commented:
Sorry of not clear - this is a hyper-v installation. When I boot I get only powershell and cmd. If I close both, I have black desktop, and that's it. Completely blank, can't do anything.

I installed this for testing, as I will probably have to do a deployment using this.

I know this weird, but It is really frustrating to stare into server with black screen only.
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Via console:

CTRL+ALT+DEL --> Task Manager --> Run --> CMD or PowerShell

Via RDP:

CTRL+ALT+END --> Task Manager --> Run --> CMD or PowerShell
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CompProbSolvCommented:
Are you talking about what you see on the host or on the VM running within the host?
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mrmutAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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Saeid FattahiCommented:
i guess you have installed the core version  of the WS. thats why you only got cmd.
try installing a WS with GUI.
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mrmutAuthor Commented:
Yes, it is core :-)  thanks for re
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
I suggest getting to know how to set things up from start to finish via PowerShell.

Starting with Core, IMNSHO, is the best way to learn. :)
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mrmutAuthor Commented:
Yes, but there is also the question why. :-)
I can drive a car without ESP and ABS, but why would I do it?

This is a fun expt for me, but not something I like per se.
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CompProbSolvCommented:
There are a couple immediate reasons to use Core:  It is free and it puts less overhead (disk, RAM, and CPU usage) on the system.

With that said, I've tried to work with it and eventually moved to the GUI.

I will also note that using PowerShell makes it much easier to document and duplicate everything.  Rather than "click on x, right-click on y, click on properties...." you have an exact text script to do what you want.  It's independent of the particular user interface and is more universal across different versions of Windows.
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Philip ElderTechnical Architect - HA/Compute/StorageCommented:
Consistency. The ability to set up a hundred servers, using PowerShell, in a consistent manner. Set up steps are copy and paste.

GUI is too time consuming.

Core is a reduced attack surface. Less updates that require a reboot. It runs stable over time versus the full GUI version.
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