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how to check the account lockout counter?

Posted on 2016-10-09
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Last Modified: 2016-10-14
how to check the account lockout counter?
what is the path in the windows 2003, 2008 servers?
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Question by:satheesh kumar
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cwstad2 earned 500 total points
ID: 41835915
Hi see the following path in the gpo editor for both server 2003/2008

In Group Policy Object Links, click Default Domain Policy or create and name your Group Policy object, and then click Edit.

Computer Configuration\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Account Policies\Account Lockout Policy
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Expert Comment

by:Justin Yeung
ID: 41835941
Hi Author,

Do you want to set? or check?

The counter is based on an Attribute badpwdcount.
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LVL 6

Expert Comment

by:Leon Teale
ID: 41836199
Use powershell, Get-ADDefaultDomainPasswordPolicy,

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In addition to the standard Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) attributes, you can retrieve the following extended properties of the Get-ADDefaultDomainPasswordPolicy cmdlet by using the -Properties parameter:

    ComplexityEnabled

    LockoutDuration

    LockoutObservationWindow

    LockoutThreshold

    MaxPasswordAge

    MinPasswordAge

    MinPasswordLength

    PasswordHistoryCount

    ReversibleEncryptionEnabled

For a full explanation of the parameters that you can pass to Get-ADDefaultDomainPasswordPolicy, at the Active Directory module command prompt, type Get-Help Get-ADDefaultDomainPasswordPolicy –detailed, and then press ENTER.
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LVL 41

Expert Comment

by:Adam Brown
ID: 41836332
The lockout timer determined by subtracting the lockout-time attribute that is written to the AD account at the time the user is locked out from the current time and comparing it with the lockout windows policy setting. If the result is less than the policy, the account remains locked out. Otherwise, the account is unlocked at login. The actual timer is not stored anywhere. It's just a value determined at login.
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LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Ajit Singh
ID: 41841878
Please refer to below links might helps you to get in more detailed:

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc775412(v=ws.10).aspx

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh994568(v=ws.11).aspx

Hope this helps!
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Author Closing Comment

by:satheesh kumar
ID: 41844145
Nice solution
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