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Using gawk to read and manipulate multiple texts from a file

Posted on 2016-10-09
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Last Modified: 2016-10-16
OS is AIX

The first part of the program check if the input  of a  particular date and group name exist in a text file. The input values need to match on that entire record in the text file. This process is similar to SQL  where clause statement.

The second part  of the program display an error message and exit the loop if there isn't a match or else continue if there is a match.  The  date format needs to change from mm/dd/yyyy to mm/dd/yy in the output of results.  The input variable n limit the number  of records that are displayed.

I'm getting an error message when I run my code. Error message: too many errors to read.

a)   Input variables in the code are
        group=hasasvmi
        date1=09/29/2016
         n=1

b)  The following is the data in the text file
       Example 1:  data in k_2016.09.29.txt :


/dev/sasdwk/hasasvmi 128 1 127  0% /sasdwk/hasasvmi  2016.09.29_11.30.27

c)   The following is an example  of the results that I want to display:



Filesystem                          GBks    Free    Used     used%                     Mt                                Date          Time
/dev/sasdwk/hasasvmi     128       1          127         0%        /sasdwk/hasasvmi        09/29/16     11:30


Here is my code:

group=hasasvmi
date1=09/29/2016
n=1
|{
read "$group"
read "$date1"
read "$n"

DISKINFO=tail $n" k_%Y.%M.%D.txt

  while IFS='' read $line

      do

        group=hasasvmi
        date1=09/29/2016

       f1='grep ^"f1" $line | awk '{print $1}''
       f2='grep ^"f2" $line | awk '{print $2}''
       f3='grep ^"f3" $line | awk '{print $3}''
       f4='grep ^"f4" $line | awk '{print $4}''
       f5='grep ^"f5" $line | awk '{print $5}''
       f6='grep ^"f5" $line | awk '{print $6}''

       If  grp= echo( $grep "$group" "$line") &&
       f7= echo ('grep " $date1" | date2= (date +%m/%d/%Y | gawk  "$line" 'BEGIN {FS=". _" OFS="/"} {print $7}'')
       && f8= (date +"%H:%M" | gawk "line" 'BEGIN {FS="_ ." OFS="."} {print $7}'')
       Then
         continue
            printf '\tFileSystem%s\tGBks%d%s\t Free%d%s\tused%d %s\tused%%s\ tMt %s\ tDate%s\ tTime%s\n'     
                   "$f1" "$f2" "$f3" "$f4" "$f5"  "$f6" "$f7" 
        else
             echo '$grp ' doesn't exist (exit)|| echo  '$f7' doesn't match the date on file for'$grp' (exit)

    fi

done <"$DISKINFO"

}

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Question by:dfn48
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arnold earned 500 total points
Comment Utility
What is the forma of the data you are trying to process?
If it spans multiple lines,  you need to define a multi-line match pattern, the other option is to combine the data into a single line and then perform the match.
I've not master the multi-line pattern match, so I tend to based on the pattern combine the multi-line data set into a single line and then match the data I am looking for.
I use perl for such purposes, you can use gawk, but I think you have to perform all the tests within versus reading a line by line in bash passing a line at a time to multiple grep Checks...

Your primary test igor span two lines meaning the first match might not be met effectively missing the data point.
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